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Rochester / Rochester Hills : Innovation & Job News

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Rochester Hills couple builds gourmet catnip company from scratch

Rochester Hills couple Rich and Lisa Jackson launched gourmet catnip company Skinny Pete's Gourmet Catnip this fall, though they've been developing their products and working the floors of trade shows for longer than that.

It was in 2014 when Rich, a professional director and visual effects artist -- wife Lisa is a producer -- was sitting at a coffee shop, working on an illustration of a cat. While listening to National Public Radio on his headphones, a story came across detailing a growing industry: Gifts for pets.

Around that same time, Rich noticed that wild catnip was growing in their garden. Imbued with an entrepreneurial spirit, the Jacksons saw an opportunity. And thus the seeds for Skinny Pete's Gourmet Catnip company were sown.

The Jacksons say there are two main focuses of their business. Their catnip is a high-quality, organic catnip. So much so, in fact, that they say that it makes for a good tea suitable for human consumption.

The other aspect that separates their product from the pack is the Skinny Pete packaging. The gourmet catnip is sold in packages of three varieties: Blue Meowy Wowy, Furmaceutical Grade, and Purruvian Pink. The catnip comes in artfully designed tins, keeping the product fresh and fresh-looking.

"We have three cats at the house, and they each respond to the catnip differently," says Rich Jackson. "Panda responds as if its a stimulant. The one we call Skinny Pete gets real lethargic. And Tucker gets real lovable and affectionate."

"Cats that ingest it act differently than the ones inhaling it."

Though they've only been officially on the market for a month or so, the Jacksons say that the response has been fantastic. The main bulk of their sales come directly from their website, though they also sell at local independent retailers. The Jacksons sell cat-related apparel and poster on their website, as well.

"One thing we've noticed with our clients is that they really love their cats," says Lisa Jackson. "There are real emotional connections there."

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

OU INC graduates international client company Car Studio

Car Studio, an OU INC client company, recently graduated from its incubator program and international Soft Landing Facility. The company’s success has allowed it to move into a nearby facility in Troy. Headquartered in Europe, Car Studio’s U.S. expansion has led the parent company to decide to keep the U.S. location in Oakland County, thereby adding jobs to the region and becoming a thoroughly successful incubator graduate.

During Car Studio’s time as a client company, OU INC provided incubation and acceleration services to assist Car Studio on their path to success. Car Studio took advantage of the benefits of being located within an incubator and soft landings program, including that of being in close proximity to other growing companies in the expansion phase.

“For us, the best things about OU INC are the spacing, the pricing, and the quiet atmosphere to start a business. OU INC has the warehouse space, which not a lot of places have,” said Andrea Abrami, president, Car Studio North America.

“Though there are many types of businesses in one office building, we all have the same startup business mentality. So, if you need anything or have questions, we’re all in it together.”

Car Studio was founded in 1986 in Europe by Dario Abrami after having gained more than 20 years of experience in the design industry. Expanding rapidly, it became one of the leading companies in the automotive and agriculture sectors. Today, Car Studio boasts experience in many different sectors and can offer a high level of technical competence thanks to qualified collaborators and state-of-the-art IT systems.

OU INC is a designated Soft Landing Facility for international companies through the International Business Association (iNBIA). iNBIA’s Soft Landings network ensures that businesses entering or expanding into a new country are provided with an accelerated introduction to that country’s business practices, regulations, and culture. Soft Landings designees help make contacts in a new country more quickly and efficiently while providing access to the resources necessary to meet their business goals.

Oakland University approves Public Relations and Strategic Communication major

The public relations professional works hard to get positive messages into the public arena through traditional and social media methods. This field requires resourceful and creative communicators who overcome increasingly crowded airwaves with impactful stories that help promote their clients’ objectives. It is also a profession expected to grow in the next several years. 
 
To fill that expected need, a newly approved Bachelor of Arts degree in Public Relations and Strategic Communication has been added at Oakland University. OU’s program begins with the Fall 2018 semester and joins only two other universities in Southeast Michigan offering such a degree. Currently, public relations is the most popular minor in the Department of Communication and Journalism. 
 
“For the first year, 30 students will be admitted into the new PR major,” said Chiaoning Su, an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism who has helped shape the curriculum. “Applications for the charter class will begin being accepted in January 2018 and will be considered contingent upon many factors, including a 3.0 grade point average or better in WRT 1060 Writing Composition II, JRN 2000 Intro to Journalism and News Writing and JRN 2500 Intro to Public Relations.”
 
 “This program will be rigorous both in theories classes and applied skills,” according to Garry Gilbert, director of the journalism program and chair of the committee that brought forward the idea of adding public relations nearly three years ago. “Several new classes will be offered including, writing for PR, research methods in public relations and a crisis communication class.”
 
The committee saw a growing interest from students and surveyed 36 area PR agencies who all thought adding this major would help graduates find jobs after college. 

“Our location is optimum for students to get a great internship in PR, and we know those internships tend to lead to jobs,” Gilbert said.
 
Su added, “Our long-term plans include establishing a chapter in the Public Relations Student Society of America and developing study abroad internship opportunities.”
 
Another encouraging sign is that employment of public relations specialists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Their PR report indicates, “The need for organizations to maintain their public image will continue to drive employment growth. Candidates can expect strong competition for jobs at advertising and public relations firms and organizations with large media exposure.”

Harness the power of leadership

Most employee development courses include: (1) Bribe people into a conference room with coffee and bagels; (2) Have someone stand in front of the room all day while telling the group things they should be doing; (3) Break into discussion groups to make things “interactive;” (4) Go home wondering what was learned. 
 
This cycle of employee development falls short in effectiveness, value and practicality. This is why Leader Dogs for the Blind developed Harness the Power of Leadership (HPL), a leadership, management and team-building workshop unlike anything in the industry. The one-day workshop is held on the Leader Dog campus in Rochester Hills or at the attending organization’s facilities. The workshop accommodates up to 24 participants (but can be adapted to varying class sizes) and teaches fundamental leadership and management concepts using guide dogs as tools to exemplify the material. 
 
Under blindfold, attendees work hands-on with guide dogs to learn concepts of effective leadership. The course is led by a person who is blind who shows how the working relationship between a Leader Dog and its handler provides valuable lessons that lead to success when applied to business.
 
“I do not consider my blindness to be a disability,” commented Leader Dog presenter Richard “Buss” Brauer.  “It certainly is an inconvenience. But the lessons Leader Dog taught me about leadership, communication and decision-making are what allowed me to achieve such a high degree of business and personal success.  People are simply blown away by how applicable this model is in the professional world.”
 
Lessons learned in many employee development courses are often forgotten and just not used. HPL is an effective program because attendees learn through personal experience so they readily remember the lessons and subsequently implement them in their daily work.

“We all know employees react negatively when they are being ‘preached to’ or face hours of lecture,” says Dani Landolt, Leader Dog’s chief marketing officer. “HPL’s value is in its unique delivery of leadership concepts and team empowerment in a truly interactive and interesting way.”
 
Leader Dog will be hosting a session of Harness the Power of Leadership open to individual attendees on October 4, 2017. This is a great opportunity to experience HPL yourself and learn how it can benefit your organization. The session will be held at Leader Dogs for the Blind, 1039 S. Rochester Road, Rochester Hills, Michigan, from 8:30-4:30 p.m. The cost for this full-day leadership experience is $375.00 per person.
 
To learn more about this valuable leadership experience, contact David Bann at Leader Dogs for the Blind by calling 248.218.6318 or emailing dave.bann@leaderdog.org.

OU retains gold status ranking among veteran-friendly schools in Michigan

For the second straight year, Oakland University was awarded the highest possible ranking for veteran-friendliness by the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency. The organization recently published its 2017-2018 list of Veteran Friendly Schools, which recognizes institutions of higher learning for dedication to student veterans and dependents utilizing their G.I. Bill and other educational benefits. 
 
“The continued growth of MVAA’s Veteran-Friendly School Program demonstrates the dedication our state’s academic institutions have to the success of our student veteran population,” said MVAA Director James Robert Redford in a release. “Michigan is fortunate to have top quality educational institutions that maintain high standards of support and services for our growing population of veterans and their families. The program makes it easy for students to identify which schools are invested in their success, and we greatly appreciate the commitment of this year’s participants.”
 
Based on a variety of factors, the 70 schools on this year’s list were grouped into bronze, silver and gold levels of recognition. Oakland was one of 41 schools to earn a gold-level designation and one of 28 schools that fulfilled all seven evaluation criteria, listed below.
  • Established process for identification of current student veterans
  • Veteran-specific website
  • Active student-operated veterans club or association
  • Veteran-specific career services, resources, advising and/or outcome monitoring
  • On-campus veteran’s coordinator and/or designated staff point of contact
  • System to evaluate and award credit based on prior military training and experience
  • Monitoring and evaluation of student veteran academic retention, transfer and graduation rates
 “This is a great honor for Oakland University, and I am humbled to be able to play a part in receiving this well-deserved recognition,” said Eric Wuestenberg, coordinator of Oakland’s Office of Veterans Support Services. “Earning the MVAA's Gold Level status for another year signifies that we continue to provide support to our students at the highest level possible, and they deserve nothing less.”
 
To learn more about veteran support services at Oakland, visit oakland.edu/veterans or call (248) 370-2010.

OU professor awarded $210,829 NSF grant for research on new terahertz generator

Dr. Andrei Slavin, a distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Physics at Oakland University, has been awarded a $210,829 grant from the National Science Foundation as part of a collaborative research project which seeks to develop a new type of terahertz generator that can be used in a variety of fields, including communication, medical imaging and security.
 
“Existing generators of terahertz radiation either work at temperatures below room temperature or are based on expensive and bulky laser systems,” Slavin said. “These significant deficiencies severely limit their usefulness. The goal of this project is to create a new type of terahertz generator that is compact, inexpensive and works at room temperature.”
 
According to Slavin, terahertz radiation falls between infrared radiation and microwave radiation on the electromagnetic spectrum. It can pass through clothing, paper, cardboard, wood, masonry, plastic and ceramics, which makes it ideal for detecting concealed weapons and explosive materials.
 
Terahertz radiation can also detect differences in density of a tissue, which could allow for effective detection of skin and surface cancer. Some frequencies of terahertz radiation can also be used for 3D imaging of teeth and may be more accurate than conventional X-ray imaging.
 
In addition, terahertz waves, which operate at a much higher frequency than microwaves, could one day be used to deliver data up to 100 times faster than today’s cellular or Wi-Fi networks.
 
“We believe that communication technology will go further with increased frequencies,” Slavin said. “So the next generation of 5G communication will probably use frequencies that are higher than current frequencies.”
 
According to Slavin, the research project is a collaborative effort between a team of experts in magnetic device fabrication at the University of California, Irvine, and leading theorists in the field of magnetic devices at Oakland University.
 
“As a result of this three-year research effort, we expect the result will be a terahertz generator that will be micro-sized – approximately 10 microns in diameter and less than 1 micron in thickness,” Slavin said, noting that 10 microns is approximately twice the size of a human blood cell.
 
“With this device, we will be able to generate approximately 1 microwatt of power at a frequency of about one-half terahertz,” he added. “You might think one microwatt isn’t a lot, but one microwatt is sufficient power for many applications, especially communication applications.”
 
The new generators will be based on readily available antiferromagnetic materials, such as iron oxide and nickel oxide, and will operate via conversion of magnetic oscillation in these materials into terahertz electromagnetic waves.
 
“Our invention is an example of trying to tap into the naturally existing internal magnetic field in the antiferromagnetic material using the fact that current propagating in the heavy metal creates a perpendicular current of spins,” Slavin said.
 
The NSF grant is for a three-year period.
 
“The grant allows us to concentrate more and intensively collaborate with our experimental counterparts at the University of California, Irvine, and creates a possibly to check our theoretical ideas experimentally,” Slavin said. “We’re very grateful to the NSF. Nobody knows whether it will work or not, but we will try to do our best to bring them an experimental prototype within three years. “
 
More information about the NSF grant can be found online at nsf.gov.

OU INC client Wave Water Works teams with engineering students for product validation

OU INC client Wave Water Works, LLC has a patented Oscillo Drive that converts the up and down movement of wave water into reusable energy and electricity. The company recently leveraged the strong relationship between OU INC and Oakland University’s School of Engineering and Computer Science (SECS) to successfully test their Oscillo Drive technology, verifying the device’s production and output of energy and electricity.  

Wave Water Works utilized talented students through the school’s senior design course. This requirement for OU senior-level engineering students brings together mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering students to work on real-world projects that demand the skills and knowledge of each of their disciplines. A State of Michigan Business Accelerator Fund award allowed for OU INC to partially fund the effort.
 
Based on the results obtained by the students, Wave Water Works approved an undisclosed operational testing site for the Oscillo Drive in Port Huron, Michigan. This extension of the OU SECS testing will allow for further measurement and monitoring of the power input and electrical output from the wave-water oscillating movements. Wave Water Works is additionally locating multiple working sites, including locations in Macomb County, Israel, and Lebanon.
 
“It is estimated that OU INC, through the professional efforts of SECS students and faculty, provided Wave Water Works with more than $1.5M worth of professional engineering services,” said Chuck Keys, project director and business manager of Wave Water Works.

Completing hardware and software research and development (R&D) for this startup green-energy company includes the following faculty and students:

·         Michael Latcha, Ph.D., ME, director, SECS Senior Design Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering
·         Daniel Aloi, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering
·         Oakland University Senior Engineering Students: 
                 -Tia Sherrard, Electrical Engineering, Team Manager
                 -Carla Gerst, Electrical Engineering
                 -Makayla Eckardt, Computer Engineering
                 -Mark Tarnicki, Electrical Engineering
                 -Brent Stelzer, Electrical Engineering
                 -William Carter, Mechanical Engineering
                 -Edwin McBride, Mechanical Engineering
                 -Paul Smyrski, Mechanical Engineering
 
For more information, contact Joan Carleton at (586) 884-9324 or jfcarlet@oakland.edu.

OU INC is a Smartzone Business Incubator and Innovation Center, in collaboration with the City of Rochester Hills, Michigan Economic Development Corporation, and strategic industry partners. With a focus on the energy, medical device, and information technology sectors, OU INC provides entrepreneurial resources and strategic business solutions for developing business ventures and accelerating ideas to market. OU INC is a designated Soft Landing Facility through the International Business Association for international companies. For more information, visit oakland.edu/ouinc.

The Business Accelerator Fund is an initiative of the State of Michigan’s 21st Century Jobs Fund Program and is distributed by the Michigan Small Business Development Center (MI­-SBDC) through the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and Michigan’s network of business accelerators. Through this program, OU INC is successfully delivering specialized business acceleration services to companies commercializing advanced technology.

51 students awarded the OCC Chancellor's Scholarship

Excerpt: 

More than 50 incoming Oakland Community College (OCC) students across the county are getting a head start on their higher education following graduation. These new students will start their first-year with tuition and fees covered by the College’s Chancellor’s Scholarship award.

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OU named among top colleges in Michigan for business majors

Excerpt

Payscale and Zippia recently named Oakland University among top colleges for business majors in Michigan. The organizations recognized Oakland based on career outcomes and return on educational investment for graduates of Oakland’s School of Business Administration. 

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New business analytics certificate expands big data education programs at OU

Every day more and more companies are leveraging the benefits of business analytics to improve customer service, enhance operational performance, identify new business markets and drive revenue growth. The industry is flourishing, and Forbes reports the market is expected to nearly double by 2020.
 
To address that demand, the Oakland University School of Business Administration now offers a full complement of business analytics programs to meet a variety of educational and career needs.
 
The newest addition is Oakland’s Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics. This five-course program is ideal for working professionals from any discipline to gain knowledge in this growing field. The program is available beginning in the fall of 2017 and students can apply online now at oakland.edu/applynow.
 
“Business analytics is moving beyond the scope of IT professionals,” said Vijayan Sugumaran, professor of Management Information Systems and chair of the Decision and Information Sciences Department at Oakland University. “Employers are increasingly seeking professionals across disciplines who can harness data to solve business problems.”
 
Employers agree that finding people who have the requisite blend of quantitative computing and business domain knowledge and skills for business analytics is a challenge. From automotive and financial services to marketing, human resources and education, career opportunities abound for those who understand how to leverage the power of data to improve business processes.
 
“Oakland’s Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics is perfect for someone seeking specific knowledge in analytics to enhance their performance or career prospects without committing to a full master’s degree program,” Sugumaran said.
 
The need for business analytics education includes, but also goes beyond, the IT profession. Recognizing this, the Oakland School of Business Administration offers a suite of programs to meet the varied interests of those seeking to expand their skills and knowledge in this area.
 
OU’s complete suite of business analytics programs includes:
  • Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics
  • MBA with a business analytics concentration
  • Master of Science in IT Management with a business analytics concentration
  • Business analytics minor for Oakland undergraduate students in any major
  • Business analytics specialization for Oakland MIS students.
 
For more information about the Business Analytics Graduate Certificate, visit oakland.edu/business/graduate-executive-programs/business-analytics-graduate-certificate.

To learn more about OU’s Business Analytics programs, visit oakland.edu/business/undergraduate-majors-minors/business-analytics.

OU INC clients Munetrix and Skypersonic awarded $125,000 via Macomb Innovation Fund

Munetrix and Skypersonic have been awarded $125,000 in funding from the Innovation Fund Macomb Community College, powered by JPMorgan Chase & Co. These two Oakland County-based companies were the sole awardees of this seventh round of funding, chosen from a pool of 17 qualified applicants. Both companies are startup clients at Oakland University’s business incubator, OU INC.

Munetrix will receive a $100,000 award to advance the company toward larger-scale funding. Munetrix is a data science and advisory firm that provides analytics, planning, transparency and compliance tools for school districts and state and local governments. For public administrators, this cloud-based technology is designed to simplify data analysis and use predictive analytics to improve the communication of financials with policymakers and other community stakeholders.

Skypersonic will receive a $25,000 award to support taking initial steps to the market. Skypersonic develops drones for indoor applications within the commercial, industrial, agricultural, and civil industries. The drone’s propeller apparatus is enclosed and protected by an external casing, and it has multiple operating modes including flying, rolling, and traveling on ground.

"We are very excited for our companies, Munetrix and Skypersonic. The support from the Macomb Innovation Fund will catalyze their growth in the market. As each of these companies are building their business, their solutions also provide valuable resources to the community. Skypersonic is providing drone educational kits to K-12 institutions, and Munetrix is providing meaningful data and scorecard resources to local governments and schools,” said Amy Butler, OU INC Executive Director.

The Innovation Fund is a $2.7 million effort to stimulate economic development and job growth among promising Detroit-area entrepreneurs and next-stage companies with high-growth potential. Funding is provided by Macomb Community College’s Strategic Fund and JPMorgan Chase, as part of the company’s $150 million commitment to Detroit’s economic recovery. Information about the application process is available at macomb.edu/cie.

For more information, contact Joan Carleton at (586) 884-9324 or jfcarlet@oakland.edu.

Oakland University to offer Master's in Systems Engineering degree

Oakland University’s Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is now offering a Master’s in Systems Engineering program with a focus on systems integration.
 
“Our department has a strong history in systems engineering, and with this master’s program we are looking to serve mechanical, electrical and other engineers involved in product design and development,” said Robert Van Til, Ph.D., chair and Pawley professor of lean studies in the Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) Department.
 
“There has always been a demand for Systems Engineers in Southeast Michigan, primarily from the automobile and defense industries,” Van Til added. “But with the growing interest in connected vehicles and other connected products, the demand for Systems Engineers is expanding rapidly in all industries.”
 
Systems Engineering is the most difficult job for companies to fill with an estimated 1,388 annual job openings in the Southeast Michigan region between 2016 and 2026, according to a Connected Mobility Industry’s Skills Needs Assessment Project (SNAP) report issued by the Oakland County Executive and the Oakland County Workforce Development Board in March 2017.
 
“With the rapid advances in connected and autonomous vehicles, the need for skilled Systems Engineers is unprecedented,” said Tracey Stanyer, senior systems engineer at ESG Automotive Inc. “Graduates with the skill set to synthesize across engineering disciplines and guide the overall engineering process will have employers beating down their door with job offers.”
 
The Oakland University program is open to engineers with a degree in any field of engineering, including mechanical, electrical and computer engineering. No preliminary or make-up courses are required.
 
“Where other engineering disciplines concentrate on the specifics of a system, Systems Engineers focus on the integration of all of these aspects into a coherent and effective system,” said Vijit Pandey, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the ISE Department.
 
While the program is built around a core of the courses listed below, the flexible nature of the course requirements allows students to tailor the program to meet their career needs:
 
• Foundation of Systems Engineering I
 
• Foundation of Systems Engineering II
 
• Engineering Project Management
 
• Product Lifecycle Management
 
• Engineering Decision Analysis
 
“The Systems Engineering M.S. educates engineers to serve as the primary interface between management, customers, suppliers and specialty engineers in the systems development process,” Pandey said.
 
Students may enter the program at any time of the year and begin their classes in either September, January or May due to the flexible nature of the course requirements.
 
“Many engineers working full-time will enroll in the Systems Engineering M.S. program on a part-time basis since all courses are offered in the evening, and some courses are also available online,” Van Til said.
 
For more information about the program, including course requirements, visit the Master’s in Systems Engineering website.

Doctoral student wins Best Full Paper Award at national cyber security conference

Ahmad Mansour, a Computer Science and Informatics Ph.D. candidate at Oakland University, recently won the award for Best Full Paper at the 12thannual Cyber and Information Security Research Conference held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. 
 
His paper, entitled “Multi-Asymmetric Cryptographic RSA Scheme,” proposed a multicast, one-to-many, cryptographic scheme that secures online communication between one sender and multiple receivers.
 
“Existing solutions for multi-asymmetric RSA schemes have limitations. They either require to trust all receivers or need to make some sort of agreements beforehand,” Mansour explained. “The proposed scheme addressed these limitations. Unlike normal cryptographic systems, this scheme allows the sender to send different information to multiple receivers, and each receiver is only able to get the message intended for him.”
 
The paper has been published in the Journal of the ACM, the official peer-reviewed journal of the Association for Computing Machinery. It was co-authored by Richard Bassous, a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science and Informatics at Oakland University, along with Andrew Davis from University of Michigan – Flint, Matthew Wagner from Missouri University of Science and Technology, Professor Huirong Fu at Oakland University, and Professor Ye Zhu at Cleveland State University.
 
The research was performed under the supervision of Professor Fu, a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department and director of OU’s Center of Cyber Security, and is partially supported by the National Science Foundation.
 
Mansour came to Oakland in 2015 after earning a bachelor’s degree from Yarmouk University in Jordan and a master’s degree from Jordan University of Science and Technology, both in Computer Science.
 
His research interests lie in the areas of Data Security, more specifically Cryptography (ECC and RSA), Steganography, and Network security, as well as their applications. His other areas of interest are Data Compression and Human Computation. His current research focuses on Multi-Asymmetric Cryptography, Multi-Symmetric Cryptography, and Vehicular Ad-hoc Network (VANETs) security and privacy.
 
To learn more about OU’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, visit the website.

Oakland University's Industrial & Systems Engineering department prepares students for Industry 4.0

Excerpt

Oakland University is working to bridge the gap between industry’s need for work-ready, highly skilled engineers and the availability of graduate and undergraduate students who identify engineering as a career path of choice. This case study from Siemens demonstrates Oakland University's commitment to preparing students to resolve workplace challenges and using innovative approaches to help companies advance their leadership positions in a global economy.

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Residency assignments indicate a bright future for the class of 2017

The class of 2017, surrounded by the people who mean the most to them, opened their Match Day envelopes on March 17 together to find out where they would be going for the next phase of their medical training - their residencies.

“You have worked so hard for this day. We are so proud to be on this journey with you,” said Dr. Angela Nuzzarello, associate dean for Student Affairs who before she led the countdown to the reveal.

Twenty-nine students will remain in Michigan. Eleven of them will head to Beaumont Hospitals, while others will remain in the Detroit area at Henry Ford Health Care System, St. John Hospital, Wayne State University and University of Michigan. Some students will be leaving the state for Stanford University (Alan Mengqiao Xi), Yale (Florence Doo), Johns Hopkins Hospital (Valerie Osasu Osula), Duke University (Manal Mirreh), Northwestern McGaw (Jonathan Hung) and Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Phillip Gray and Michael Rezaee).

Twelve students secured “couples matches,” a nod to the personality of the third OUWB class, where many students seemed to find love. Married couple Carin and Brian Malley, survived the rigors of medical school as a married couple and endured the stress of a “couples match.” Their next adventure begins at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Medical Education, where they will both fulfill residencies in emergency medicine. Opposite of the Malleys are Michigan native Georgina Morris, of Novi, and Andrew Leamon, of Cupertino, Calif. who secured a couples match and will remain in Michigan. Morris will be at Beaumont in internal medicine and Leamon will be in emergency medicine at St. John Hospital.

Overall, 30 students of the class of 2017 will enter primary care residencies with the remaining 58 pursuing specialties in neurological surgery, emergency medicine, orthopaedic surgery, psychiatry, obstetrics-gynecology, urology, radiology-diagnostics, anesthesiology, and dermatology.

For the full list of results, visit Match Day.
 
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