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Health + Wellness : Innovation & Job News

79 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All

Beaumont Health tests Michigan's first 3D whole breast ultrasound for cancer detection

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Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn is one of eight centers nationwide participating in research to improve the detection of breast cancer in women by using SoftVue three-dimensional ultrasound technology on women with dense breast tissue.

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Tech248 member MatchRX revolutionizing surplus prescription drug industry

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Check out this cool Tech248 member company MatchRX a private web-based inter-pharmacy marketplace to buy and sell small quantities of non-controlled, non-expired overstocked prescription drugs and drugs in short supply to satisfy a specific patient need or declared public health emergency.

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5Qs with founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You

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DBusiness Daily News interviewed Nicholas Kristock, founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You of Novi, about the nonprofit’s mission to create a more hopeful hospital environment by providing fleece blankets tagged with video messages to children battling an illness. Kristock played semi-professional soccer in Australia while working for four charities and considers the sport the “vehicle” that brought him to the nonprofit world. 

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Beaumont Health named 'Most Wired' by American Hospital Association

Beaumont Health has been named among the nation’s Most Wired Advanced hospitals according to results of the 19th Annual Health Care’s Most Wired survey, released today by the American Hospital Association’s Health Forum.

“The Most Wired hospitals are using every available technology option to create more ways to reach their patients in order to provide access to care,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “They are transforming care delivery, investing in new delivery models in order to improve quality, provide access and control costs.”

According to the survey, Most Wired hospitals use smartphones, telehealth and remote monitoring to create more ways for patients to access health care services and capture health information. This year’s results show:
  • 76 percent offer secure messaging with clinicians on mobile devices.
  • When patients need ongoing monitoring at home, 74 percent use secure emails for patients and families to keep in touch with the care team.
  • 68 percent simplify prescription renewals by letting patients make requests on mobile devices.
  • 62 percent add data reported by patients to the electronic health record to get a better picture of what is going on with the patient.
  • Nearly half of the hospitals are using telehealth to provide behavioral health services to more patients.
  • 40 percent offer virtual physician visits.
  • More than 40 percent provide real-time care management services to patients at home for diabetes and congestive heart failure.
“At Beaumont Health, information technology helps our clinicians and patients make informed decisions about health care,” said Subra Sripada, executive vice president, chief transformation officer and chief information officer. “We use technology to engage the communities we serve and improve their experience. Receiving this award again reaffirms our team’s accomplishments and demonstrates Beaumont’s commitment to leveraging technology to advance the delivery of care in order to produce better outcomes for our patients.”

Innovation in patient care embraces emerging technologies and underscores the need for secure patient information exchange. Hospitals have increased their use of sophisticated IT monitoring systems to detect patient privacy breaches, monitor for malicious activities or policy violations and produce real-time analysis of security alerts.
  • 97 percent use intrusion detection systems.
  • 96 percent perform data access audits.
  • Nearly 90 percent run targeted phishing exercises to teach employees to question suspicious emails.
Most Wired hospitals are transforming care delivery with knowledge gained from data and analytics. They are investing in analytics to support new delivery models and effective decision-making and training clinicians on how to use analytics to improve quality, provide access and control costs.
  • 82 percent analyze retrospective clinical and administrative data to identify areas for improving quality and reducing the cost of care.
  • Three-quarters use sophisticated analytics such as predictive modeling and data to improve decision-making.
  • Nearly 70 percent interface electronic health record data with population health tools for care management.
  • More than 70 percent are providing data analytic tools training to physicians and nurses.
  • 45 percent initiate a patient pathway using health IT to follow a care plan.
  • Nearly 40 percent deliver quality metrics to physicians at the point-of-care.
  • 32 percent have tools for real-time patient identification and tracking for value-based care conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
HealthCare’s Most Wired survey, conducted between Jan. 15 and March 15, 2017, is published annually by Health & Hospitals Networks. The 2017 Most Wired survey and benchmarking study is a leading industry barometer measuring information technology use and adoption among hospitals nationwide.

The survey of 698 participants, representing an estimated 2,158 hospitals — more than 39 percent of all hospitals in the U.S. — examines how organizations are leveraging IT to improve performance for value-based health care in the areas of infrastructure, business and administrative management; quality and safety; and clinical integration.

Detailed results of the survey and study can be found in the July issue of H&HN. For a full list of winners, visit www.hhnmag.com.

About Beaumont Health
Beaumont Health is Michigan’s largest health care system, based on inpatient admissions and net patient revenue. A not-for-profit organization, it was formed in 2014 by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide patients with the benefit of greater access to extraordinary, compassionate care, no matter where they live in Southeast Michigan. Beaumont Health has total net revenue of $4.4 billion and consists of eight hospitals with 3,429 beds, 174 outpatient sites, nearly 5,000 physicians and 36,000 employees and 3,500 volunteers.  In 2016, Beaumont Health had 177,508 inpatient discharges, 17,536 births and 567,658 emergency visits. For more information, visit beaumont.org.

About the American Hospital Association
The AHA is a not-for-profit association of health care provider organizations and individuals that are committed to the improvement of health in their communities. The AHA is the national advocate for its members, which include nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems, networks and other providers of care. Founded in 1898, the AHA provides education for health care leaders and is a source of information on health care issues and trends. For more information, visit www.aha.org.
 

Special needs adults earn praise and a paycheck at Mi Abilities

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Bear Hall is on a mission to find meaningful work for young adults with disabilities. 

“What started this three years ago was I heard a statistic that in Huron Valley, from ages 25-54, there had been 1,200 kids on IEPs (individualized education program) and only 8 percent of them got a job. Ninety-six out of 1,200. And I said something has to change and it can’t just be jobs pushing carts and bagging.

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Henry Ford to offer innovative cancer screenings for dense breasts

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In a first for Michigan, the Henry Ford Cancer Institute is introducing a new and advanced molecular breast imaging system to screen women with dense breast tissue, who are at an increased risk for breast cancer.

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Baker College of Auburn Hills respiratory care program achieves national "distinguished" credential

The respiratory care program at Baker College’s Auburn Hills campus has, for the third consecutive year, been recognized with the Distinguished RRT Credentialing Success Award from the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).

Programs receiving the recognition are considered using objective criteria from the 2016 Annual Report of Current Status. The criteria includes three or more years of outcomes data; a documented student RRT credentialing success of 90 percent or greater; holding accreditation without a progress report; and meeting or exceeding CoARC thresholds for CRT credentialing success and positive job placement.

“Receiving this credential again underscores that our program is achieving its goals as well as our students,” said Peter W. Karsten, Ph.D., CPA, Baker College of Auburn Hills president. “Each time a Baker College respiratory care student achieves his or her goals, there is a health care employer that has hired an exceptional employee.”

Credentials for a registered respiratory therapist (RRT) and/or a certified respiratory therapist (CRT) are used as the basis for licensure in the 49 states that regulate the practice of respiratory care.

Respiratory therapists work primarily in health care facilities caring for patients who have trouble breathing, such as from a chronic respiratory disease like asthma or emphysema. Patients range from premature infants with undeveloped lungs to elderly patients with lung disease. Respiratory therapists also provide emergency care to patients suffering from heart attacks, drowning or shock.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of respiratory therapists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2014 to 2024, which is faster than average for all occupations. The median annual wage for respiratory therapists was $58,670 in May 2016. Baker College’s Auburn Hills campus launched its respiratory care associate degree program in 2006.

For more information about Baker College programs, contact Nicole Chirco in the admissions office at nicole.chirco@baker.edu or 248.340.0600, or visit www.baker.edu.

The largest private college in Michigan, Baker College is a not-for-profit higher education institution accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Founded in 1911, Baker College grants doctoral, master’s, bachelor’s and associate degrees, as well as certificates in diverse academic fields including applied technology, business, education, engineering, health science, information technology and social science. Baker College has on-ground campuses throughout Michigan and offers online programs that can be completed 100 percent online without ever visiting a campus. In 2016, the Online Learning Consortium recognized Baker College Online with the OLC Quality Scorecard Exemplary Endorsement, the highest ranking for online higher education programs. For information, visit www.baker.edu or follow Baker College on Twitter, @bakercollege, or on Facebook, www.facebook.com/bakercollege.
 

Judson Center's Autism Connections has begun a movement with over 30 official partners

During the month of April, Judson Center will be honoring National Autism Awareness month as we Bring Autism to Light for World Autism Day (officially on April 2). Judson Center’s main campus in Royal Oak (13 Mile and Greenfield Road), will be lit up blue beginning on Friday, March 31, and will continue to the end of the month. 
 
A movement has begun – Judson Center is teaming up with the City of Royal Oak to help Bring Autism to Light. During the next City Commissioners meeting, this Monday, March 27, Royal Oak Mayor, Michael Fournier along with the City Commissioners, will present an autism proclamation honoring National Autism Awareness Month and the life changing programs at Judson Center’s Autism Connections. Royal Oak is also urging all employees, residents and members of the business community to join the movement.
 
Many other partners, including the Royal Oak School DistrictTroy School Districtthe Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor (where Judson Center’s second Autism Connections program is located), Signs by Tomorrow, Medical Network One Health Solutions, Shrine Catholic Schools, Epsilon, Brooks Kushman, as well as over 20 other community businesses and organizations are joining the movement. 
 
Judson Center’s Royal Oak office is offering free blue light bulbs and lawn signs to anyone interested. You may also pick up lawn signs and light bulbs from Royal Oak City Hall as well as all three Royal Oak Fire Departments.  Companies can also participate and Bring Autism to Light by shining blue for autism, designating a day to wear blue for autism awareness, and making a donation to Judson Center’s Autism Connections.
 
“It is an honor to have the support of the community we serve.  At Judson Center’s Autism Connections, we understand that a diagnoses affects the entire family, not just a child and that is why this campaign is so important. To let our community know that you are not alone, Judson Center is here to help and support our community and families”, shared Judson Center CEO & President, Lenora Hardy-Foster.
 
Autism awareness is a part of Judson Center each day, as its Autism Connections program has been a part of Metro Detroit for over ten years, and expanded into Washtenaw County soon after, both providing comprehensive services to the entire family.  Currently, one in 68 children are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in Michigan, there are over 50,000 individuals living with ASD. 

Oakland University professor examines evolution of infectious disease with NIH grant

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The National Institutes of Health has awarded Fabia Battistuzzi, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Biological Sciences at Oakland University, a $417,286 grant that will allow her to examine the evolution of infectious diseases while laying the groundwork for the development of new drug-based treatments that could help to save thousands of lives. 

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Waterford native provides a variety of running gear at shop

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Paul Coughlin and his staff at the three locations of Runnin’ Gear want to see, touch and even smell your old running and athletic shoes.

Don’t worry, they have a good reason. Simply put, it is the best way to ensure that the next pair of running shoes you purchase is indeed a perfect fit.

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Beaumont Hospital unveils renovated cardiac lab in Farmington Hills

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As part of an ongoing $160 million expansion plan, Beaumont Hospital in Farmington Hills has opened its updated Cardiac Catheterization Lab, which was taken out of service in mid-October to install an advanced imaging system.  

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Lawrence Tech, St. John Providence to launch new bachelor's degree in nursing

St. John Providence and Lawrence Technological University have received state approval to establish a nursing education program.
 
The program, which will open in the Fall 2017 semester in August, will have classroom instruction at Lawrence Tech’s Southfield campus, with clinical and laboratory instruction at six St. John Providence hospital locations around metro Detroit. St. John Providence is part of Ascension, the largest non-profit health system in the U.S. and the world’s largest Catholic health system.
 
The new program will fall under Lawrence Tech’s College of Arts and Sciences as a major in the LTU Department of Natural Sciences, granting a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
 
“Michigan and the nation as a whole are in the midst of a continuing shortage of qualified, well-trained nurses,” Lawrence Tech President Virinder Moudgil said. “We aim to help solve that problem with a nursing education program that will take full advantage of our 85-year history as a technologically advanced university. Our founding motto, ‘Theory and Practice,’ is a perfect description of the kind of nursing education we will deliver with our partners at Providence.”
 
“This partnership is part of our ongoing commitment to providing the training our future nurses need so they can deliver the high quality and compassionate care that patients expect and deserve,” said St. John Providence President & CEO, Jean Meyer.
 
The Michigan Board of Nursing approved the application for the new nursing program Thursday.
 
Lawrence Tech has hired Therese Jamison, DNP, ACNP-BC, as professor of nursing and director of the program. Jamison earned her Doctorate of Nursing Practice from Vanderbilt University. Earlier, she earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Master’s Degree in Nursing from Wayne State University, as well as a post-master’s certificate as an acute care nurse practitioner from the University of Michigan.
 
A veteran nursing specialist, Jamison continues to work one day a week as a nurse practitioner in cardiovascular services at St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital, Warren Campus.
 
The six St. John Providence hospital locations are: St. John Hospital & Medical Center, Detroit; St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital, Warren Campus; St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital, Madison Heights Campus; Providence-Providence Park Hospital, Southfield; Providence-Providence Park Hospital, Novi; and St. John River District Hospital, East China Township.
 
The new nursing program will admit an initial cohort of 32 students for the Fall 2017 academic semester, and 32 new students per year thereafter.
 
Jamison said the LTU-St. John Providence nursing program will be unique in that it will admit qualified students directly into the nursing program, and nursing classes will start in the curriculum’s first term. Most nursing programs admit students to a “pre-nursing” program for two years of prerequisite courses, then admit a smaller number of those students to the formal nursing program.
 
Also unique is the close academic-practice partnership between LTU and St. John Providence, Jamison said. Most nursing programs offer their clinical programs through a wide variety of hospital groups, creating barriers for students in navigating the healthcare system.
 
The LTU-St. John Providence program will conduct its courses year-around over 11 semesters, requiring 126 credit hours of study.
 
St. John Providence is one the largest providers of inpatient care in southeast Michigan. St. John Providence provides comprehensive prevention, primary care and advanced treatment programs with more than 125 medical centers and six hospital locations spanning five counties. 
 
Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.
 

Toys 'R' Us to carry Walled Lake-based Zollipops

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Toys ‘R’ Us has announced that it will begin carrying Zollipops, a dental health-friendly lollipop manufactured by Walled Lake-based LOL, in its stores nationwide.

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Students focus on eye diseases during summer research program

For the past three months, a select group of six undergraduate students has worked with faculty in Oakland University’s Eye Research Institute (ERI) on projects investigating causes and potential cures for eye diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts and retinopathy. 
 
The students – Maya Sammane, Adam Seidel, Maria Donovan, Anthony Premceski, Reham Karana and Regan Miller – took part in OU’s Summer Undergraduate Program in Eye Research (SUPER), helping carry out experiments that could lead to breakthroughs in treatments for vision loss.

Utilizing the latest scientific methodologies and equipment, students worked under guidance from ERI faculty mentors on research sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.
 
“I originally wanted to go into crime scene investigation, but after this experience I've changed my career goals,” said Miller, a junior biology major. “I love the idea of being able to work on treatments for people with diseases.”
 
Under the mentorship of Dr. Ken Mitton, Miller monitored the growth of cells found in vessels of the retina, comparing two versions of the growth factor VEGF. Abnormal growth of these cells is associated with various retinal diseases, Miller explained.
 
“While the body needs VEGF to form vessels to deliver nutrients and oxygen, an excess amount will cause abnormal growth and could eventually cause retinal detachment or other complications,” she said.
 
Premceski, mentored by Drs. Frank Giblin and Vidhi Mishra, worked on a project examining the interaction between alpha crystallin protein and an alpha crystallin peptide using fluorescence polarization. The goal was to find out whether the peptide was binding to the protein, increasing the risk of cataracts.
 
“As humans age, the crystallin protein in the lens breaks down to form peptide,” said Premceski, a sophomore biomedical sciences major and member of the OU Honors College. “We hypothesized that the peptide was binding to the protein and speeding along the formation of the aggregates. These aggregates are what cause cataracts.”
 
Working with Dr. Giblin, junior biology major Maria Donovan researched the development of cortical cataracts.
 
“A possible cause of cortical cataracts is solar UVB light, so my project was to investigate the process of DNA damage and repair in cultured human lens epithelial cells, in the presence of UVB-induced radiation,” said Donovan, who plans to attend medical school.
 
“I came into the Eye Research Institute with little knowledge about research and came out knowing that I will be involved in research throughout my lifetime, as a doctor.”
 
Sammane, a sophomore biomedical sciences major, said that the SUPER program has taught her that, in addition to technical know-how, the research process requires a healthy blend of pragmatism and patience.
 
“It's easy to want to plan every single step in order to complete a goal, but you have to remember that based on your results, your next step may take you into a different direction,” said Sammane. “Research is not something you can necessarily speed up or even anticipate exact results for. You have to be willing to put in the time, work and patience required.”
 
Sammane’s research focused on light adaptation in the eye, exploring how photoreceptor cells –  rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells –  contribute to dopamine synthesis in the retina.
 
“We determine dopamine synthesis levels in retina samples (collected from mice) by using a research method called Western Blot, which allows us to quantify a target protein, tyrosine hydroxylase, that represents dopamine synthesis levels,” said Sammane, who credits her mentors, Dr. Dao-Qi Zhang and Sheng-Nan Qiao, for guiding her though the experience.
 
 “If there is a deficiency of dopamine in the visual system, there can be a risk for reduced vision or even a condition called myopia, which is nearsightedness.”
 
Using a mouse model, Seidel measured the thickness of the retina to determine whether the Peripherin 2p/rds mutation Y-285 STOP CODON causes retinal degeneration in mice. The findings from this experiment will help researchers understand the potential effect of this mutation in the human eye, he explained.
 
“Peripherin is a photoreceptor protein in the retina, which affects the regeneration of photoreceptor disks necessary for normal vision. If the photoreceptor disks are unable to regenerate, the result is retinal degeneration, which causes vision loss,” said Seidel, who was mentored by Dr. Andrew Goldberg.
 
Seidel, a junior liberal studies major and OU Honors College member, said the SUPER program helped him to appreciate the broad skill set and knowledge base that research requires.
 
“While I learned a great deal, I have a better perspective of how much more I need to learn about the research process,” he said. “With this in mind, I have planned additional coursework in statistics and biochemistry.”
 
Mentored by Dr. Shravan Chintala, Karana examined the role of the Rtca enzyme in causing glaucoma in mice.
 
“The back of the eye has cells called ganglion cells which take visual information up to the brain. Damage to ganglion cells results in a loss of vision,” said Karana, a junior and OU Honors College member majoring in biology. “An article came out stating that an enzyme called Rtca caused the loss of these cells in fruit flies. We were interested to see if this was true with other animals.”

The students worked in the lab roughly 30 hours per week for 12 weeks, learning research fundamentals, including keeping a research notebook, evaluating research literature and following laboratory protocols. Acceptance into the SUPER program is selective, according to ERI Director Frank Giblin.
 
“We look for high-achieving students in science and math, especially organic chemistry and calculus,” said Dr. Giblin. “Most of our students have an interest in medical school or graduate school. About 75 to 80 percent go on to pursue graduate education.”
 
Dr. Giblin said the program is geared toward underclassmen and that most of the participants continue to work with their faculty mentors after their SUPER experience has ended. Some have gone on to publish scholarly articles with their mentors.
 
“Most of the students come in knowing very little about research,” Dr. Giblin said. “They learn from the ground up about how research is conducted, the scientific method, how to formulate a hypothesis, how frustrating research can be and the failures that happen along the way. Research is difficult, but you can achieve a satisfying result.”
 
To apply for the program, students submit a personal narrative outlining career goals and interests, a letter of reference, academic transcripts and a resume. They are also interviewed by ERI faculty members.
 
Those admitted to the program receive a research fellowship of $3,750. Students also attend a weekly Vision Science seminar given by ERI and Beaumont Ophthalmology faculty and receive training in professional speaking and presentation.
 
The SUPER program concludes with a symposium on Friday, July 29 during which students will deliver 15-minute PowerPoint presentations on their projects. Open to the public, the event runs from 9:30 a.m. – noon, in room 254 of the Engineering Center on OU’s campus.
 
To learn more about the Eye Research Institute at Oakland University, visit oakland.edu/eri.

CycleBar to open locations in Troy, Northville Township

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CycleBar, a national boutique fitness franchise that offers indoor cycling classes, will open two metro Detroit locations in Troy and Northville Township.

“Boutique fitness is exploding,” says Jeff Wayne, franchise owner of CycleBar Northville. “Some people are migrating away from big-box gyms. We describe our ride as communal, intoxicating, and fun. People like that environment.” 

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79 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All
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