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Medical Main Street : Innovation & Job News

52 Medical Main Street Articles | Page: | Show All

Trainee first responders learn to save lives through mobility


This feature is courtesy of Driven, the story of how the Detroit region is leading the world in next-generation mobility.

When first responders are on their way to an emergency, nothing is more important than information, because data learned in advance can save time and lives.

Critical information can tell first reponders if the the road ahead is clear, the size of the building on fire, if people are inside, and what kind of fire suppression system exists in the building.

With smart infrastructure enabling the new world of smart mobility, EMTs could have access to this information, and much more. They’ll also need to be trained to use new tools to gather this potentially life-saving data. That's why a number of companies, including Lear Corp., have helped install an array of new sensor technology into the Combined Regional Emergency Services Training (CREST) mini-city at Oakland Community College.

In addition to Lear’s roadside unit (RSU) sensors, HAAS Alert provided consumer alert applications, Mobile Data Holdings provided real-time video, and TracksUS provided in-vehicle diagnostics.

Running the show is Elaina Farnsworth, thought leader in the autonomous and intelligent transportation industry, and Mobile Comply CEO, says the sensors should be in place by this spring, allowing first responder trainees to test them in a real-world environment. Some of the connections will run through traffic lights, and some radios will be equipped with DSRC (dedicated short-range communication) devices to see if the safety messaging channel can be more effective.

"It really allows us to be very clear and targeted around new technologies that could aid and help these emergency responders in a controlled environment," Farnsworth says.

Mobile Comply was founded in 2010 to provide education and certification work for professionals who wanted to get into connected technology. She says the CREST project is the perfect next step in both educating the next generation of first responders and testing the sensors.

"We started talking about how nice it would be if we could have a conglomerate of different companies that would contribute something to be able to start training our emergency responders how to use some of these connected vehicle technologies," she says. "How can it make their jobs easier? How can it make saving lives faster?

Eventually, she hopes to incorporate drone technology, too, into the array of sensors getting real-time data from the scene of an emergency.

Douglas Smith, executive director for workforce development at Oakland Community College, says Lear has placed the sensors in the buildings and testing will wait until the weather clears up in the springtime. From there, they'll develop training modules for emergency workers.

Beaumont Health acquires Southfield building for shared services

Beaumont Health has purchased the First Center building in Southfield to consolidate shared services employees currently working in 16 owned or leased buildings in three counties across Metro Detroit.

“This consolidation of our business services that support patient care is a major step forward in advancing our commitment to being the employer of choice,” said Carolyn Wilson, chief operating officer, Beaumont Health. “It will allow teams in separate locations to work together in an updated, collaborative space with amenities our employees want, promoting teamwork, while enhancing efficiency and reducing cost. It will also help free up much-needed space on our hospital campuses for patient care, by pulling business and administrative professionals out of our inpatient settings.”

Beaumont evaluated 45 properties in Metro Detroit before deciding to purchase the First Center building on Northwestern Highway near Lahser Road. The 686,000-square-foot multi-tenant building was built in 1984 and sits on 31 acres of land.

Beaumont will initially occupy 360,000-square-feet in the building. Existing tenant leases will remain and will be evaluated going forward. The building will be renamed and branded as a Beaumont facility along with existing tenant signage.

About 2,500-3,000 Beaumont employees will be relocated to the building in phases by the end of 2018. Beaumont’s financial services team will lead the way, relocating in early 2018, once building renovations are complete.

Details of what other departments will move and when are still being worked out, but could include functions such as compliance, legal affairs, information technology, human resources and others.

“This is another important step in pulling Beaumont Health together as one high performance organization providing the highest quality patient care and demonstrating best practices in all patient care support areas,” said John Fox, CEO, Beaumont Health. “With 38,000 employees and 5,000 physicians, we are in a great position to positively impact the overall health status in Southeast Michigan.”

The building’s open floor plan office design will include meeting rooms, shared amenity areas and collaborative spaces. Work teams will have input in customizing their work areas. The building will also include a first-floor conference center for large Beaumont business meetings.

“We will be creating an open, collaborative and flexible work environment based on the latest research around workplace design,” said Wilson. “This new work environment will optimize employee productivity and outcomes which will ultimately benefit the patients and families we serve.”

Neumann/Smith of Southfield is the architectural and design firm working with Beaumont on the design and renovation of office space.

Beaumont began its search for a shared services location in mid-2015 after looking at where its shared services employees live and identifying Southfield as a central location that would minimize additional drive time for many employees affected by the move.

Beaumont Health tests Michigan's first 3D whole breast ultrasound for cancer detection

Excerpt

Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn is one of eight centers nationwide participating in research to improve the detection of breast cancer in women by using SoftVue three-dimensional ultrasound technology on women with dense breast tissue.

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Tech248 member MatchRX revolutionizing surplus prescription drug industry

Excerpt

Check out this cool Tech248 member company MatchRX a private web-based inter-pharmacy marketplace to buy and sell small quantities of non-controlled, non-expired overstocked prescription drugs and drugs in short supply to satisfy a specific patient need or declared public health emergency.

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Beaumont Health named 'Most Wired' by American Hospital Association

Beaumont Health has been named among the nation’s Most Wired Advanced hospitals according to results of the 19th Annual Health Care’s Most Wired survey, released today by the American Hospital Association’s Health Forum.

“The Most Wired hospitals are using every available technology option to create more ways to reach their patients in order to provide access to care,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “They are transforming care delivery, investing in new delivery models in order to improve quality, provide access and control costs.”

According to the survey, Most Wired hospitals use smartphones, telehealth and remote monitoring to create more ways for patients to access health care services and capture health information. This year’s results show:
  • 76 percent offer secure messaging with clinicians on mobile devices.
  • When patients need ongoing monitoring at home, 74 percent use secure emails for patients and families to keep in touch with the care team.
  • 68 percent simplify prescription renewals by letting patients make requests on mobile devices.
  • 62 percent add data reported by patients to the electronic health record to get a better picture of what is going on with the patient.
  • Nearly half of the hospitals are using telehealth to provide behavioral health services to more patients.
  • 40 percent offer virtual physician visits.
  • More than 40 percent provide real-time care management services to patients at home for diabetes and congestive heart failure.
“At Beaumont Health, information technology helps our clinicians and patients make informed decisions about health care,” said Subra Sripada, executive vice president, chief transformation officer and chief information officer. “We use technology to engage the communities we serve and improve their experience. Receiving this award again reaffirms our team’s accomplishments and demonstrates Beaumont’s commitment to leveraging technology to advance the delivery of care in order to produce better outcomes for our patients.”

Innovation in patient care embraces emerging technologies and underscores the need for secure patient information exchange. Hospitals have increased their use of sophisticated IT monitoring systems to detect patient privacy breaches, monitor for malicious activities or policy violations and produce real-time analysis of security alerts.
  • 97 percent use intrusion detection systems.
  • 96 percent perform data access audits.
  • Nearly 90 percent run targeted phishing exercises to teach employees to question suspicious emails.
Most Wired hospitals are transforming care delivery with knowledge gained from data and analytics. They are investing in analytics to support new delivery models and effective decision-making and training clinicians on how to use analytics to improve quality, provide access and control costs.
  • 82 percent analyze retrospective clinical and administrative data to identify areas for improving quality and reducing the cost of care.
  • Three-quarters use sophisticated analytics such as predictive modeling and data to improve decision-making.
  • Nearly 70 percent interface electronic health record data with population health tools for care management.
  • More than 70 percent are providing data analytic tools training to physicians and nurses.
  • 45 percent initiate a patient pathway using health IT to follow a care plan.
  • Nearly 40 percent deliver quality metrics to physicians at the point-of-care.
  • 32 percent have tools for real-time patient identification and tracking for value-based care conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
HealthCare’s Most Wired survey, conducted between Jan. 15 and March 15, 2017, is published annually by Health & Hospitals Networks. The 2017 Most Wired survey and benchmarking study is a leading industry barometer measuring information technology use and adoption among hospitals nationwide.

The survey of 698 participants, representing an estimated 2,158 hospitals — more than 39 percent of all hospitals in the U.S. — examines how organizations are leveraging IT to improve performance for value-based health care in the areas of infrastructure, business and administrative management; quality and safety; and clinical integration.

Detailed results of the survey and study can be found in the July issue of H&HN. For a full list of winners, visit www.hhnmag.com.

About Beaumont Health
Beaumont Health is Michigan’s largest health care system, based on inpatient admissions and net patient revenue. A not-for-profit organization, it was formed in 2014 by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide patients with the benefit of greater access to extraordinary, compassionate care, no matter where they live in Southeast Michigan. Beaumont Health has total net revenue of $4.4 billion and consists of eight hospitals with 3,429 beds, 174 outpatient sites, nearly 5,000 physicians and 36,000 employees and 3,500 volunteers.  In 2016, Beaumont Health had 177,508 inpatient discharges, 17,536 births and 567,658 emergency visits. For more information, visit beaumont.org.

About the American Hospital Association
The AHA is a not-for-profit association of health care provider organizations and individuals that are committed to the improvement of health in their communities. The AHA is the national advocate for its members, which include nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems, networks and other providers of care. Founded in 1898, the AHA provides education for health care leaders and is a source of information on health care issues and trends. For more information, visit www.aha.org.
 

Henry Ford to offer innovative cancer screenings for dense breasts

Excerpt: 

In a first for Michigan, the Henry Ford Cancer Institute is introducing a new and advanced molecular breast imaging system to screen women with dense breast tissue, who are at an increased risk for breast cancer.

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Diagnostic biomarkers in saliva show promise in recognizing early Alzheimer's disease

Your spit may hold a clue to future brain health. Investigators at the Beaumont Research Institute, part of Beaumont Health in Michigan, are hopeful that their study involving small molecules in saliva will help identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease - a neurologic condition predicted to reach epidemic proportions worldwide by 2050.

Their study, “Diagnostic Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease as Identified in Saliva using 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics” was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease 58(2) on May 16.

Investigators found salivary molecules hold promise as reliable diagnostic biomarkers.

The study exemplifies the quest by scientists to combat Alzheimer’s disease, a degenerative brain disorder with no cure and few reliable diagnostic tests. In the United States, Alzheimer’s is a health epidemic affecting more than 5 million Americans. Investigators seek to develop valid and reliable biomarkers, diagnosing the disease in its earliest stages before brain damage occurs and dementia begins.

Researcher Stewart Graham, Ph.D. said, “We used metabolomics, a newer technique to study molecules involved in metabolism. Our goal was to find unique patterns of molecules in the saliva of our study participants that could be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease in the earliest stages, when treatment is considered most effective. Presently, therapies for Alzheimer’s are initiated only after a patient is diagnosed and treatments offer modest benefits.”

Metabolomics is used in medicine and biology for the study of living organisms. It measures large numbers of naturally occurring small molecules, called metabolites, present in the blood, saliva and tissues. The pattern or fingerprint of metabolites in the biological sample can be used to learn about the health of the organism.

“Our team’s study demonstrates the potential for using metabolomics and saliva for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease,” explained Dr. Graham. “Given the ease and convenience of collecting saliva, the development of accurate and sensitive biomarkers would be ideal for screening those at greatest risk of developing Alzheimer’s. In fact, unlike blood or cerebrospinal fluid, saliva is one of the most noninvasive means of getting cellular samples and it’s also inexpensive.”

The study participants included 29 adults in three groups: mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and a control group. After specimens were collected, the researchers positively identified and accurately quantified 57 metabolites. Some of the observed variances in the biomarkers were significant.  From their data, they were able to make predictions as to those at most risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

Said Dr. Graham, “Worldwide, the development of valid and reliable biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease is considered the No. 1 priority for most national dementia strategies. It’s a necessary first step to design prevention and early-intervention research studies.”

As Americans age, the number of people affected by Alzheimer’s is rising dramatically. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, by 2050, it’s estimated the number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease will triple to about 15-16 million.

Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia affecting a person’s ability to think, communicate and function. It greatly impacts their relationships, their independence and lifestyle. The condition’s toll not only affects millions of Americans, but in 2017, it could cost the nation $259 billion.

The Beaumont Research Institute study was partly funded by the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

The eight investigators are now seeking additional funding to conduct a larger, three-year study with significantly more participants to validate the pilot study. Seven of the researchers are with the Beaumont Research Institute; Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine; and one is with the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.
 

Inventor is helping to get 5 million people back on their feet

Excerpt

When Katy Olesnavage was a little girl, she was fascinated by her mom's work as a physical therapist.

The 27-year-old Ferndale High graduate learned early on about the challenges people face when they lose a limb and about navigating the world in a wheelchair or on crutches.

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LTU's annual Cisler Lecture to feature UM President on advances in medicine

Lawrence Technological University’s 2017 Walker L. Cisler Lecture will feature the president of the University of Michigan speaking on the remarkable advances of modern medicine.

The lecture will be held Thursday, March 23 on the LTU campus, 21000 W. 10 Mile Road in Southfield.

UM President Mark Schlissel, M.D., Ph.D., will speak on “From the Discovery of DNA to the Modification of the Human Genome: How Basic Science Fuels Disease Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment.”

The lecture begins at 7 p.m. in the Mary E. Marburger Science and Engineering Auditorium, Room S100 of the LTU Science Building. A dessert reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public. For location and directions, visit www.ltu.edu/map.

The Walker L. Cisler Lecture Series was founded at Lawrence Tech with a generous gift from the Holley Foundation. Well known for his leadership of Detroit Edison from 1954 to 1971, Cisler enjoyed a career that spanned a lifetime of personal, professional, civic, and business accomplishments. As an international ambassador for the American utility industry, and a tireless humanitarian, he strived to improve the quality of life for people everywhere.

Schlissel became the 14th president of UM, and the first physician to take the position, in July 2014. He previously was provost of Brown University, where he was responsible for academic and budgetary functions, as well as libraries and research institutes.
A native of Brooklyn, N.Y, Schlissel earned a Bachelor of Arts in biochemical sciences from Princeton University in 1979, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in physiological chemistry from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1986. He did his residency in internal medicine at Hopkins Hospital and conducted postdoctoral research as a Bristol-Myers Cancer Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Schlissel joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1991, and earned several awards and fellowships for his research and teaching. He moved to the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California-Berkeley in 1999 as associate professor, advancing to full professor in 2002.

His research has focused on the developmental biology of B lymphocytes, the cell type in the immune system that secretes antibodies. His work has contributed to a detailed understanding of genetic factors involved in the production of antibodies and how mistakes in that process can lead to leukemia and lymphoma. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 scientific papers and trained 21 successful doctoral candidates.

He was UC-Berkeley’s dean of biological sciences in the College of Letters & Science and held the C.H. Li Chair in Biochemistry until his appointment as Brown’s provost in 2011.

About LTU:
Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. The Brookings Institution ranks Lawrence Tech fifth nationwide for boosting graduates’ earning power, PayScale lists it in the top 10 percent of universities for graduates’ salaries, and U.S. News and World Report places it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus in Southfield, Michigan, include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

Oakland University professor examines evolution of infectious disease with NIH grant

Excerpt

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Fabia Battistuzzi, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Biological Sciences at Oakland University, a $417,286 grant that will allow her to examine the evolution of infectious diseases while laying the groundwork for the development of new drug-based treatments that could help to save thousands of lives. 

Read more.
 

Beaumont Hospital unveils renovated cardiac lab in Farmington Hills

Excerpt: 

As part of an ongoing $160 million expansion plan, Beaumont Hospital in Farmington Hills has opened its updated Cardiac Catheterization Lab, which was taken out of service in mid-October to install an advanced imaging system.  

Read more.
 

Delphinus Medical Technologies lands in larger HQ in Novi

Newer, bigger and better offices often come to startups that lock down a multi-million-dollar venture capital raises. Add Delphinus Medical Technologies to that list now that it has moved on up to a newer, bigger and better headquarters in Novi.

The biotech startup has called Plymouth its home for most of its five years. Then it landed one of the largest rounds of venture capital in Michigan history last fall. The $40 million Series C round (led by Farmington Hills-based Beringea) will go toward developing and selling its whole breast ultrasound system, growing its team and finding a bigger place to house that team. At 21,000 square feet, the company's new home in Novi is three times larger than its previous office in Plymouth.

"It's just a fabulous facility," says Mark Forchette, president and CEO of Delphinus Medical Technologies. "It has a great, inspiring cultural vibe to it."

Delphinus Medical Technologies is creating a new way to detect breast cancer utilizing technology spun out of Wayne State University and the Karmanos Cancer Institute. SoftVue is a whole breast ultrasound system that allows physicians to image the entire breast, including the chest wall. The technology platform incorporates a circular ultrasound transducer, producing cross-sectional ultrasound cross-sections through the entire volume of breast tissue. 

The new headquarters will provide more space for research and development of SoftVue. Delphinus Medical Technologies has hired eight people so far this year, growing its team to just shy of 50 people.

Delphinus Medical Technologies signed a lease on its new office with the idea of providing enough room for R&D and also to act as a showcase for that technology. Forchette expects to host frequent visits from healthcare leaders, customers and vendors, so the company has added a dedicated demonstration room.

"We have room to grow," Forchette says. "We have a facility here that is multifunctional. We have lab space and office space and demonstration space."

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

U.S. FDA approves Rockwell's Triferic(R) powder packet for treating anemia in hemodialysis patients

Rockwell Medical, Inc. (NASDAQ:RMTI), a fully-integrated biopharmaceutical company targeting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) with innovative products and services for the treatment of iron replacement, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hemodialysis, announced today that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the New Drug Application for Triferic Powder Packet for commercial sale as an iron replacement product to maintain hemoglobin in adult patients with hemodialysis dependent chronic kidney disease. Triferic is the Company's innovative iron-replacement drug for the treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease patients receiving hemodialysis.

"We are pleased to obtain this FDA approval for the Triferic powder packet," stated Robert L. Chioini, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Rockwell. "Our mind-set is to continually improve, and this new Triferic presentation is a fine example. The Triferic powder packet is similar to the size of a packet of sugar. It is much smaller and lighter than the current Triferic liquid ampule and it enables us to place three-times greater the number of units in an even smaller carton. This presentation is much more convenient for customers as it reduces storage space and requires fewer reorders to maintain inventory. We expect it to be commercially available shortly."

About Triferic
Triferic is an innovative iron replacement product that is delivered to hemodialysis patients via dialysate, replacing the ongoing iron loss that occurs during their dialysis treatment. Triferic is added to the bicarbonate concentrate on-site at the dialysis clinic. Once in dialysate, Triferic crosses the dialyzer membrane and enters the blood where it immediately binds to transferrin and is transported to the erythroid precursor cells to be incorporated into hemoglobin. Triferic delivers sufficient iron to the bone marrow and maintains hemoglobin without increasing iron stores (ferritin). Please visit www.triferic.com or call Rockwell Medical at 800-449-3353 for more information.

About Rockwell Medical
Rockwell Medical is a fully-integrated biopharmaceutical company targeting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) with innovative products and services for the treatment of iron replacement, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hemodialysis.

Rockwell's Triferic is indicated for iron replacement and maintenance of hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients. Triferic delivers iron to patients during their regular dialysis treatment, using dialysate as the delivery mechanism. Triferic has demonstrated that it safely and effectively delivers sufficient iron to the bone marrow and maintains hemoglobin without increasing iron stores (ferritin).

Rockwell's FDA approved generic drug Calcitriol is for treating secondary hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients. Calcitriol (active vitamin D) injection is indicated in the management of hypocalcemia in patients undergoing chronic renal dialysis. It has been shown to significantly reduce elevated parathyroid hormone levels. Reduction of PTH has been shown to result in an improvement in renal osteodystrophy. 

Rockwell is also an established manufacturer and leader in delivering high-quality hemodialysis concentrates/dialysates to dialysis providers and distributors in the U.S. and abroad. As one of the two major suppliers in the U.S., Rockwell's products are used to maintain human life by removing toxins and replacing critical nutrients in the dialysis patient's bloodstream. Rockwell has three U.S. manufacturing/distribution facilities.

Rockwell's exclusive renal drug therapies support disease management initiatives to improve the quality of life and care of dialysis patients and are intended to deliver safe and effective therapy, while decreasing drug administration costs and improving patient convenience. Rockwell Medical is developing a pipeline of drug therapies, including extensions of Triferic for indications outside of hemodialysis. Please visit www.rockwellmed.com for more information.
 

Research is improving medical imaging scans for better patient care

Medical imaging systems make it possible for health care professionals to see processes within the body so they can diagnose, monitor or treat medical problems. It’s a growing industry — one market research company is forecasting growth from $30.2 billion in 2013 to $49 billion in 2020.  

Oakland University researcher Jing Tang, Ph.D., ABSNM, and her small team in the Biomedical Imaging Laboratory in the School of Engineering and Computer Science, are part of the imaging revolution that is improving diagnosis and treatment. 

Dr. Tang, assistant professor in the department and director of the imaging laboratory, leads research designed to improve medical image reconstruction, evaluation, and analysis techniques. More specifically, Dr. Tang, two graduate students and a postdoctoral researcher are working on algorithms that, when incorporated into equipment software, will improve the images generated by certain imaging systems. 

Dr. Tang’s current research, funded by a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, involves data from the emerging and cutting-edge hybrid PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) biomedical imaging system. PET imaging, she says, measures functional information in the body, while MRI imaging provides anatomical information with better soft tissue contrast than a computer tomography (CT) — scan. 

The hybrid imaging system is relatively new, having received Food and Drug Administration approval in 2011. The technology is used primarily for oncology, neurology and cardiology applications. 

“Whether the two systems are used sequentially or simultaneously, the hybrid PET/MRI system gives physicians more detailed and thorough information than a single system scan,” Dr. Tang says. “Most prefer simultaneous scans, but even with both options in place, there are more technical difficulties to overcome,” she adds. 
 

The brain PET image from a patient radiotracer (11C-DPA-713) study reconstructed using (a) the conventional reconstruction method and (b) the newly developed reconstruction method incorporating the anatomical information from (c) the corresponding MR image. The new method demonstrates its potential in clinical quantitative PET imaging. 11C-DPA-713 is a promising radiotracer for evaluating translocator protein (TSPO) binding with PET. TSPO can serve as a marker of neuro-inflammation. 
Collaborating with OUWB School of Medicine 
Dr. Tang’s research into how to improve the images generated by the hybrid imaging systems involves close collaboration with Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine physicians. 

“They are our real-world connections,” Dr. Tang says. “They tell us what kind of image problems they would like us to solve and we develop algorithms to address them. For example, a doctor might say there are artifacts in certain areas of the images, and ask us to find a solution to that problem.” 

The work involves determining how to overcome obstacles involved with forming the image as well as how to make the most of the integrated data generated by both imaging methods — PET and MRI. 

“The images generated by the data collected in the scans are already very good,” Dr. Tang notes, “but there’s room for improvement. For example, organ movement and signal loss when traveling through the body both have an impact on the resulting image that physicians study. How can we overcome those issues?” 

The goal, she says, is to use modern techniques to extract more information from the data to create even higher quality images. The work could, ultimately, contribute to providing patients with personalized medicine. 

“The better the image, the better able physicians will be to see what’s going on and decide on the best, most targeted treatment,” she says. 

Sharing developments 
The research results will eventually get translated into code that will be incorporated into medical imaging equipment software. 

More immediately, the team’s research results are shared in medical specialty conference papers and presentations. For example, team members made two presentations at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging annual meeting in June, including “Anatomy-assisted direct 4D parametric image reconstruction for dynamic cardiac PET imaging.” 

Dr. Tang also received funding through the National Science Foundation’s Broadening Participation Research Initiation Grants in Engineering to reach and engage historically under-represented minority students. Working with undergraduate students, she created and presented to Detroit-area high school students the “I See You” workshop on biomedical imaging. 

“We want to interest underrepresented students, including young women, in engineering careers in general but also in biomedical engineering and biomedical imaging careers specifically,”
Dr. Tang says. “We’ve recently been able to collaborate with the School of Engineering and the School of Medicine, so we have a greater variety of presenters and presentations.” 

Providing better patient care 
As Dr. Tang continues her research to improve the images generated by hybrid PET/MRI technology, she remains focused on her end goal: Better care for patients. 

“For me, it’s not about publishing high-profile papers or moving up through the ranks in academia, although that’s all good. My ultimate goal is to contribute to the well-being of people throughout the world,” Dr. Tang says. 

In fact, it is why she chose medical imaging over offers in other fields that included the oil industry. 

“Improving health care is what’s in my heart,” she says. “My lab’s contribution right now is tiny, but we’re doing things that will help.” 
 

Beaumont Hospital - Royal Oak earns nine U.S. News & World Report 'Best Hospitals' national rankings

Beaumont Hospital - Royal Oak earned national recognition by U.S. News & World Report in nine medical specialties in the “Best Hospital” rankings released today. The Royal Oak hospital ranked No. 2 in Michigan and in Metro Detroit in its 21st consecutive year of national recognition by U.S News.

Less than 3 percent of the nearly 5,000 hospitals analyzed for Best Hospitals 2015-16 earned a national ranking in even one specialty. This is the 26th year U.S. News & World Report has ranked hospitals.

Beaumont Hospital - Royal Oak is nationally ranked in the following nine medical specialties for 2015-16:
  • Cardiology & Heart Surgery - #22
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Diabetes & Endocrinology - #17
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Gastroenterology & GI Surgery - #18
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Geriatrics - #23
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Gynecology - #40
  • Nephrology (Kidney) - #37
  • Neurology &  Neurosurgery - #25
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Orthopedics - #16
    Top-ranked in Michigan
  • Pulmonology - #22
In addition, Beaumont - Royal Oak received a “high-performing” regional ranking in Urology. Beaumont Hospital - Troy earned “high-performing” regional rankings in eight medical specialties: Diabetes & Endocrinology; Gastroenterology & GI Surgery; Geriatrics; Nephrology; Neurology & Neurosurgery; Orthopedics; Pulmonology; and Urology. It is ranked No. 8 in Michigan and No. 5 in Metro Detroit.

Beaumont Hospital - Grosse Pointe earned “high-performing” regional rankings in Orthopedics and Pulmonology and is ranked No. 16 in Michigan and No. 9 in Metro Detroit.

Oakwood Hospital - Dearborn, now part of Beaumont Health, earned a “high performing” regional ranking in Nephrology and is ranked No. 23 in Michigan and No. 13 in Metro Detroit.

“This recognition reflects the ongoing work and dedication of the Beaumont team to constantly improve quality, safety and service for the benefit of the patients and families we serve,” says John Fox, president and CEO, Beaumont Health. “It also demonstrates our Board’s commitment to providing state-of-the-art technology and facilities for our team members to deliver the highest quality care.”

”We are proud to be part of an elite group of hospitals that have been nationally ranked by U.S. News for 21 consecutive years,”  says David Wood, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer, Beaumont Health. “This is a credit to our medical leadership, our medical staff and to our nurses and other team members who are all focused on providing extraordinary, compassionate care every day.”

U.S. News evaluates hospitals in 16 adult specialties. In most specialties, it ranks the nation’s top 50 hospitals and recognizes other high-performing hospitals that provide care at nearly the level of their nationally ranked peers.

U.S. News publishes Best Hospitals to help guide patients who need a high level of care because they face particularly difficult surgery, a challenging condition, or added risk because of other health problems or age. Objective measures such as patient survival and safety data, the adequacy of nurse staffing levels and other data largely determined the rankings in most specialties.

The specialty rankings and data were produced for U.S. News by RTI International, a leading research organization based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Using the same data, and the new “Best Hospitals for Common Care” rating published in May, U.S. News produced the state and metro rankings.

The rankings are published at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals and will appear in print in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2016 guidebook, available in August.

About Beaumont Health

Beaumont Health is a not-for-profit organization formed by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide patients with the benefit of greater access to the highest quality, compassionate care, no matter where they live in Southeast Michigan. It consists of eight hospitals with 3,337 beds, 163 outpatient sites of care and about 5,000 physicians. Beaumont Health is Southeast Michigan’s largest health care employer with nearly 35,000 employees. In 2014, the combined organizations had 174,675 inpatient admissions, 16,213 births and 492,073 emergency visits. For more information, visit beaumonthealth.org.
 
52 Medical Main Street Articles | Page: | Show All
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