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Oakland University bringing Plum Market to campus Fall 2018

Plum Market will become Oakland University’s newest dining partner and will be located in the newly renovated Oakland Center on the university’s Rochester campus.

Plum Market is a privately-owned Michigan-based company operating five full-service grocery stores, a location at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, and more than 10 food service operations across Southeast Michigan and Chicago.
 
Plum Market was selected for its variety of healthier and innovative food choices and desire to help build a sense of community around dining. The company specializes in using only the freshest ingredients with an emphasis on organic produce and All Natural meats, and locally-sourced products. Oakland University serves a volume of 23,000 meals a week and just over 350,000 meals each semester.
 
Chris Reed, Director of the Oakland Center, said, “Along with our campus-wide food service vendor Chartwells Higher Education, OU is proud to partner with Plum Market as the flagship dining location in the Oakland Center, which is currently undergoing a major renovation and expansion. The Plum Market location will include a CoffeeBar featuring freshly brewed Zingerman’s Coffee, so this opportunity to bring two well-known Michigan-based companies into this highly anticipated facility expansion provides something new and exciting for the OU community.” Plum Market will be the centerpiece on the main level of the new expansion.
 
Students will now have access to Plum Market’s variety of chef crafted options that are made from scratch. Typical menu options will include:
  • A Showcase featuring seasonally fresh composed salads and globally infused recipes
  • All Natural meat and seafood entrées available at our Carving Station
  • Grab & Go artisan sandwiches and Organic snacks
  • All Natural soups with vegetarian choices and meat-based options
  • A CoffeeBar featuring Zingerman’s brewed coffee and freshly baked goods offered daily 
The mission is to recreate how people think about eating.  With the growing attention to food quality and eating healthy, Oakland University and Plum Market’s partnership will focus on quality food, service, and a level of engagement with students and faculty will go beyond to meet the expectations. Plum Market customizes each menu to best fit the specific wants and needs of students and faculty, including accommodating food allergies.

“This is an exciting time for Oakland University, and the relationship with Plum Market will truly enhance the student experience on campus," said Glenn McIntosh, VP for Student Affairs and Chief Diversity Officer at OU. "Not only will this help attract new students, but it will also be a destination for the local community to visit campus and become a part of Oakland University.”
 
This program’s goals align directly with Oakland University’s vision to bring healthy, high- quality meals to college dining options.  “We could not be more excited to open this Plum Market location,” said Plum Market CEO and Co-Founder Matt Jonna. “It’s an honor to have our brand complement Oakland University’s newly renovated dining facility. We believe our concept brings fresh and healthy offerings many of the students and staff will appreciate.”
 
About Plum Market: Plum Market is your source for Natural, Organic, and Local food and beverage essentials. The Michigan-based company is privately-owned by Matt and Marc Jonna, and operates five full-service grocery stores across Bloomfield Township, Michigan; West Bloomfield, Michigan; Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Chicago, Illinois; and has a location in the McNamara Terminal of the Detroit Metropolitan Airport. Plum Market’s Food Service division operates more than 10 locations across Southeastern Michigan.  For more information, visit www.plummarket.com, join us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/PlumMarket and follow us @PlumMarket on Twitter and Instagram. 
 
About Oakland University: Oakland University is a doctoral, research university located on 1,443 acres of scenic land in the cities of Rochester Hills and Auburn Hills in Oakland County, Michigan. The University has 140 bachelor's degree programs and 137 graduate degree and certificate programs. Oakland is a nationally recognized public university with nearly 20,000 students. Academics include programs in the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business Administration, School of Education and Human Services, School of Engineering and Computer Science, School of Health Sciences, School of Medicine and School of Nursing.

'Soundings Series' speakers use music to unite, engage community

For nearly a year, the founders of the Soul Food concert series — Mark Stone, associate professor of music at Oakland University, and Dwayne Anthony, community relations specialist and arts commissioner for the city of Pontiac — have been bringing their message of peace and unity through music to the Oakland County community.
 
On Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, they’ll share how they did it — and how others can do it too — during the next installment of Oakland University’s popular Soundings Series, which features examples of faculty successfully taking their research out of the classroom and using it to make a positive difference in the world.
 
The next Soundings Series event — Soul Food: Music as a Ladder and a Bridge — will take place from 3-4:30 p.m. Jan. 10 in the Oakland Room at the Oakland Center.
 
“The overt mission of the Soundings Series is to help faculty on the OU campus learn how to become publicly engaged academics or intellectuals, wherever that may be on the spectrum of public engagement,” said Dave Stone, Ph.D., chief research officer for Oakland University. “The more covert mission is to get people of different disciplines in a room together.”
 
According to Anthony, bringing people together is what Soul Food is all about.
 
“We’re trying to grab all types of musicians, bring them in one room, and share their positivity and music with the community,” he said. “That’s what we’re trying to do. We’re one human race, so let’s promote love and togetherness. That’s what Soul Food is about, and that’s why we think it’s such important work to continue to do that.”
 
Presented by the Pontiac Arts Commission and sponsored by the OU/Pontiac Initiative, Soul Food was inspired by Professor Emeritus Marvin “Doc” Holladay, who established Oakland University’s World Music Program in 1975. It features different groups, representing a diverse range of cultural and spiritual traditions, sharing their message of peace and unity.
 
“One of the jobs of the Pontiac Arts Commission is to be a connector,” said Professor Stone, who also serves on the commission. “I often do find myself acting as a translator between cultural communities. That’s what Soul Food is about; this idea of common humanity that centers around the oneness in humanity. We have all different languages and music, and there are different religions and cultural traditions, but if we dig deep enough to what we’re really about, that’s where we start making the connections.”
 
A leading expert in global percussion performance and education, Stone has performed with the foremost musicians in Uganda, Ghana, Trinidad, South Africa, India and the United States.
 
“A lot of my research can be divided into two areas,” Professor Stone said. “One is researching music traditions, like those from Ghana, and understanding them. The other side is contemporary composition. I’m a composer, so when I go to India, I’m studying the music but at the same time I’m also doing performances with some of the top musicians in India. These are collaborative efforts, and that’s something I think other researchers can relate to because it poses a huge problem to be solved in terms of how you bring these two different traditions together and create something that really connects with an audience.”
 
The Soundings Series event will help faculty learn how to bridge that gap, as well.
 
“If you think about it, when people are singing, they’re singing together,” Anthony said. “They all have the same goal — to make the melody sound right. They’re not thinking ‘I’m black, you’re white’ — they’re just trying to sound good together. Everything else is thrown away in that moment when the music is really good and everyone is singing together. That’s what music does. It unifies. It takes you out of who you are.”
 
The next Soul Food concert will take place at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 in Varner Recital Hall at Oakland University. Admission is free and the event will be followed by a post-concert reception and discussion led by OU Religious Studies faculty.
 
For more information about the Soundings Series, visit oakland.edu/research/soundings-series. To attend an event, RSVP to Leanne DeVreugd, program assistant for Women in Science, Engineering and Research (WISER) at Oakland University, at ldevreug@oakland.edu.

Local businesses receive more than $2.1 million from the state to hire or train nearly 3,100 workers

A total of 86 Oakland County businesses were awarded $2,154,000 in Skilled Trades Training Funds this week from Michigan’s Talent Investment Agency.

Oakland County employers – with the support of Oakland County Michigan Works! – were awarded funds to hire and train 1,584 new employees, expand the skills of 1,538 existing workers and create 46 new registered apprenticeships over the next year.

“This is wonderful news for our employers and job seekers,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “The first year we applied three businesses received awards. Now, four years later, 86 businesses qualified for funding to find and train new and existing employees, as well as launch apprenticeships. Our Michigan Works! team of trained professionals worked with a broad range of companies to design training programs aligned with their changing needs.”

Since 2013, Oakland County employers have received more than $7.3 million of Skilled Trades Training Funds from Oakland County Michigan Works! and the state of Michigan. Workers will be trained and receive industry-recognized credentials in advanced manufacturing, software programming, construction trades and robotic operations.

Area companies receiving grants include: P3 North America (Southfield), Rayconnect (Rochester Hills), Independence Commercial Construction, Inc. (Waterford), Marada Industries – Magna (New Hudson) and Northern Sign (Pontiac). An industry-led collaborative application of regional construction companies was also funded to pursue a joint training effort.

“Our goal is to help companies find the talent they need to be successful,” said Jennifer Llewellyn, workforce development manager for Oakland County. “This includes making them aware of such resources as the state’s Skilled Trades Training Fund and then assisting them with the application process. It’s very rewarding to see so many companies’ hard work pay off.”

Oakland County Michigan Works! provides talent attraction, management and retention services for businesses, and career management, training and placement for job seekers at eight locations in Oakland County.

Contact OaklandCountyMIWorks.com or 800-285-9675 for more information.

Tamarack Camps expands outdoor education program with Adventure and Retreat Center

Excerpt

After operating as Tamarack Camps Outdoor Education in Ortonville for more than 50 years, the non-profit has rebranded its year-round, experiential team building, leadership training, and nature appreciation programs as the Tamarack Adventure and Retreat Center. Located on more than 1,100 acres in northern Oakland County, Tamarack Adventure and Retreat Center hosts schools, corporate teams, and recreational clubs for personalized programs during the day or overnight.

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Helping hands: Library, robotics team partner to produce limbs for kids

Excerpt

There’s giving a hand – and there’s giving 200 hands.

That’s one of this year’s goals for the Novi Public Library. Partnering with the Novi High School robotics team, the library is working to establish itself as an official chapter of e-NABLE, joining the group’s grassroots effort to create free 3D-printed limbs for kids overseas who’ve lost a hand, arm or fingers due to war, disease or natural disaster.

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Oakland Early College hosts the Galileo-Saudi Arabia Leadership Project

Saudi Arabian counselors, principals and supervisors spent a full day immersed in Oakland Early College's (OEC) educational processes as part of the Galileo-Saudi Arabia Leadership Project at Oakland University. It is just one of the stops on their research and educational journey to rebuild Saudi Arabia's educational system.

A recognized leader for its partnership between higher education and high school, OEC staff and leadership showcased their non-traditional, hybrid model where students graduate with a dual high school diploma and Associates degree.

The November 1 visit included staff and student presentations, tours of campus and a lunch panel featuring OEC staff and students. The visiting group was eager to know more about the accreditation process, the benefits of a high school on a college campus and why students decided on OEC.

"I moved to the US from Saudi my senior year of high school. I don't know what I'm going to do. I don't know what I want to be in 10 years. I don't even know what I'm going to eat for lunch today. I chose OEC because it gave me an opportunity to first have more time to get involved in the American system unlike a normal high school and be able to explore more creative programs like communications," said student, Rahaf Azzam.

When asked about student support, OEC instructor Kyle Heffelbower shared, "The OCC campus is actually really good with their academic supports for early college students. They have high school tutors through National Honor Society and the College provides tutoring resources. The academic skills center can help a lot of students with math and writing webinars. These are all good things that the College provides for college-level classes that our students can access because they are, in fact, college students."

OEC Head of School Jennifer Newman shared, "If I can leave you with one thought concerning early colleges, it is this: Slowly easing your high school students into the world of college, by gradually increasing their college workload over their high school career, will make them stronger students and much more likely to be successful when they enter the university world."

Hosted through Oakland University's Galileo Institute for Teacher Leadership, the Saudi group will spend the next six months living and learning in Oakland County as part of the international program. The program is dedicated to improving the learning of all students, elevating the education profession, enhancing the leadership skills of teachers, and fulfilling the vital role of public education in achieving a civil, prosperous and democratic society.

About OCC - With five campuses throughout Oakland County, OCC offers degrees and certificates in approximately 100 career fields as well as university transfer degrees in business, science and liberal arts. The College provides academic and developmental experiences allowing each student to reach their full potential and enhance the communities they serve.  More than 45,000 students annually attend OCC; more than a million students have enrolled in the College since it opened in 1965. Learn more at oaklandcc.edu.

OU Soundings Series to highlight importance of community engagement

Oakland University’s popular Soundings Series, which features examples of faculty successfully taking their research out of the classroom and using it to make a positive difference in the world, will return on Monday, Nov. 27 with a special presentation by Ali Woerner, associate professor of dance and co-founder of “Take Root,” a contemporary dance company-in-residence at OU.
 
The event will take place from 3-4:30 p.m. in 242 Elliott Hall. Woerner will be presenting information about Take Root’s Dance for Parkinson’s Disease Program, why it’s important and ways higher education can be used to improve the lives of others in the community. She will also be highlighting her own community engagement efforts in Oakland County.
 
“Community engagement is so important to what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s the way we started, and it’s the way we’ve survived. We let people know what’s going on. Not only that, but we get them to tell others about the program, or come to the class themselves. Sometimes the hardest part is just getting them in the room.”
 
Based on the Mark Morris Dance Group’s “Dance for PD” program, the Dance for Parkinson’s Disease program at Oakland University was developed to empower those living with Parkinson’s Disease (PD), as well as their caregivers, spouses and family members, to explore movement and music through a program that engages their minds and bodies in an enjoyable social environment.
 
“We try to give them a space that’s safe,” Woerner said. “That’s really important, especially for this group of people who are dealing with being vulnerable every minute of their lives. They worry about being able to cross the street in time, about getting to the phone when it rings, etc. It’s just a constant thing for them. To give them an hour where they don’t have to worry, where they can just have fun, it’s great. Sure, we talk about how the movements are going to help them physically, but we don’t harp on it. That’s not our purpose. We’re there to make them feel good.”
 
According to Woerner, the classes are currently offered in three locations in Oakland County:
  • Oakland University, 201 Meadow Brook Road, Rochester, Mich.
  • The Older Person’s Commission, 650 Letica Drive, Rochester, Mich.
  • St. Joseph Mercy Oakland, 44405 Woodward Ave., Pontiac, Mich.
 “What I think is really interesting about this work is that the basis of it is dance, but it’s also dealing with a medical issue and a neurological disease,” Woerner said. “So it really cross-pollinates because you’re dealing with education, health sciences, nurses, physical therapy, dance therapy, music, etc. It’s really exciting because you’re touching all those groups. In fact, I think that’s why we’ve been as successful as we have been with the program.”
 
For more information about the Soundings Series, contact Leanne DeVreugd, program assistant for Women in Science, Engineering and Research (WISER), at ldevreug@oakland.edu, or visit the Soundings Series website at Oakland.edu/research/soundings-series.

Cranbrook Educational Community launches free mobile app for campus visitors

The Cranbrook Educational Community has introduced a new mobile app to help guests navigate and explore its 319-acre campus. Accessible on mobile devices, the app can be downloaded for free on the App Store or Google Play. A web version of the app is also available at http://cranbrook.oncell.com
 
"Cranbrook is one of the world's leading centers of education, science, and art. We have an Academy of Art and Art Museum, Center for Collections and Research, House & Gardens, Institute of Science, and Pre-K through 12th grade private Schools, all on one campus," said Dominic DiMarco, President of Cranbrook Educational Community. "Now we have one collective app to share the offerings of each of these program areas and enhance the visitor experience."  
 
Visitors can use the app to learn about Cranbrook on self-guided tours of approximately 100 public sites, navigate its campus with interactive maps, and find upcoming public events. If GPS location services are enabled, the app will alert users when they are nearby points of interest. A 'Favorites' function allows users to easily bookmark pages for quick access.
 
The Cranbrook app expands on and replaces former apps offered by Cranbrook House & Gardens and Cranbrook Institute of Science. The app was developed using OnCell's do-it-yourself app builder, a popular platform among cultural destinations. 

Polk Penguin Conservation Center named 2017 exhibit award winner

The Detroit Zoo’s Polk Penguin Conservation Center received the 2017 Exhibit Award from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) on September 12 during its annual conference, held this year in Indianapolis. The award is the top honor bestowed annually upon accredited institutions for excellence in exhibit design.

“This award is the highest honor in exhibit design, and recognizes the Detroit Zoo for their dedication and expertise in designing a novel, immersive habitat that provides the best in animal care and welfare as well as a superior educational experience for visitors,” said Dan Ashe, AZA president and CEO.

The penguin center opened in April 2016 and led the Detroit Zoo to record-breaking attendance last year. Among the most spectacular features of the $31-million, 33,000-square-foot facility is a 326,000-gallon, 25-foot-deep aquatic area where visitors can watch more than 80 penguins of four species – king, gentoo, macaroni and rockhopper – explore their habitat. An underwater gallery with a vast acrylic window and two acrylic tunnels provides breathtaking views of the birds below water and allows guests to get nose to beak with the charismatic birds in aquatic “flight”.

“An incredible amount of creativity, ingenuity and research went into the development of the Polk Penguin Conservation Center’s unique design, including crossing the Drake Passage to Antarctica and observing thousands of penguins in the wild,” said Ron Kagan, executive director and CEO for the Detroit Zoological Society (DZS). “We wanted first and foremost to create an experience that allowed the penguins to thrive and that was also thrilling for our visitors. The result is the most extraordinary conservation center for penguins in the world that redefines ‘state of the art’ for zoo penguin habitats.”

While the facility provides a remarkable experience for people, the penguin habitat itself is designed to ensure an optimal atmosphere for the welfare of the birds. Their air temperature is set to a near-freezing 37 degrees Fahrenheit and the water at 40 degrees Fahrenheit. The environment encourages wild behavior, from diving and porpoising to nesting and rearing young.

Inspired by Sir Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Antarctic expedition and epic crossing of the Drake Passage, the Polk Penguin Conservation Center evokes the harsh and visceral ice world of the southern continent, recreated in a 360-degree 4-D entry experience on the deck of Shackleton’s ship that includes blasts of polar air, sea mist and snow. Reminiscent of a tabular iceberg with a crevasse and waterfall, the striking exterior conjures the stark and beautiful Antarctic icescape.

The Polk Penguin Conservation Center was designed by Jones & Jones, architects of the Detroit Zoo’s Arctic Ring of Life and National Amphibian Conservation Center, and by Albert Kahn Associates, architects of the Zoo’s Ruth Roby Glancy Animal Health Complex. World-renowned polar ecologist and penguin expert Dr. Bill Fraser, director of the Polar Oceans Research Group, was a key consultant on the project.

The AZA is the accrediting body for the top zoos and aquariums in the U.S. and seven other countries; there are currently 231 accredited institutions, including the Detroit Zoo, which has been continuously accredited since 1985. The AZA is dedicated to the advancement of zoos and aquariums in the areas of conservation, animal welfare, education, science and recreation.

Rochester College social entrepreneurship program helps boost jobs at local non-profits

Just a year into its Social Entrepreneurship program and Rochester College and its students have already made a difference in a local nonprofit. And with the start of the semester Wednesday, Aug. 30, the program seeks to repeat its successes once more.

In the fall of 2016, its first semester, Rochester's new Center for Social Entrepreneurship partnered with Detroit's Mariners Inn, a social services program dedicated to helping men battling homelessness and substance abuse. Students spent the first eight weeks studying social enterprises and business planning and then met with Mariners Inn to identify needs.

Jaymes Vettraino, Director of the Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Rochester College, teaches the courses. He says the conversations between students and the nonprofit drive the program, not so much the instructor.

What they decided on was a parking lot business. Taking advantage of Mariners Inn's location across from the newly-constructed Little Caesars Arena, land is being re-purposed to accommodate event parking and could be ready in time for the Detroit Lions game on Sept. 10.

The goal, ultimately, was to find a way to increase revenue for Mariners Inn, create jobs for its clients, and supply the men with usable skills.

"Mariners Inn is really taking the concepts we presented to them and running with it," says Vettraino. "They're considering something similar for janitorial jobs and even hired a Social Enterprise employee to manage the mission."

"They're running with it in a meaningful and important way."

With a new school year comes a new partnership. This time, the Center for Social Entrepreneurship has partnered with Dutton Farm of Michigan. The non-profit works with people with physical, mental, or emotional impairments, providing them opportunities to participate in meaningful production activities, like making soaps, bath salts, and lotions. They also offer job placement services.

Learn more about Rochester College's Center for Social Entrepreneurship online.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

OUCARES partnership earns national award for autism training

The Oakland University Center for Autism Outreach Services (OUCARES) and partners at Oakland County and Oakland County Parks and Recreation, have been recognized with an Achievement Award from the National Association of Counties (NACo).

The national awards program honors innovative, effective county government programs that enhance services for residents.
 
NACo selected the group as Best in Category for their collaboration on a unique training program where OUCARES staff members teach the park staff how to better recognize, understand and interact with individuals on the Autism spectrum.
 
“We have had a strong relationship with the county government and the parks and recreation department for several years,” said Kristin Rohrbeck, director of OUCARES. “The autism training program for park staff members just seemed like a natural progression of our partnership and everyone involved knew it would benefit the community.”
 
During this year’s autism training, park supervisors learned to recognize common characteristics of autism spectrum disorder and how to communicate effectively by breaking information down into simple steps, keeping verbal statements short and maintaining a low voice among other strategies.
 
After the training, the park staff have a chance to utilize their new skills each year when they host an OUCARES Autism Camp at Independence Oaks County Park. Campers are picked up and bused to the park for activities including pontoon boat rides, fishing, an inflatable bounce house, tropical maze and dinosaur slide, nature center hike and naturalist class instruction.
 
Then NACo President Bryan Desloge said of the award announcement, “Counties overcome complex challenges, provide essential services and constantly do more with less. We applaud these Achievement Award-winning counties for outstanding efforts to improve residents’ quality of life.”
 
Nationally, awards are given in 18 different categories that reflect the vast, comprehensive services counties provide. The categories include children and youth, criminal justice, county administration, information technology, health, civic engagement and many more. Each nominee is judged on its own merits and not against other applications.
 
The program was also cited by NACo as one of this year’s 100 Brilliant Ideas at Work: http://www.naco.org/brilliant-ideas/oucares-day-camp-and-staff-training
 
NACo recognized this year’s winners at its 2017 Annual Conference and Exposition in Franklin County, Ohio.

World War I and America coming this fall to the Orion Township Public Library

The Orion Township Public Library is one of 120 institutions nationwide that was recently awarded a World War I and America grant to host a series of events about the impact of WWI in America. The grant marks the 100th anniversary of the nation’s entry into the war in 1917.

 

“We apply for grants like World War 1 and America to bring high-quality speakers to our library at minimal cost, and to speak about subjects of interest to our patrons that align with our library mission ‘To serve and engage a thriving community of life-long learners,’” said Beth Sheridan, head of adult services at the Orion Library. “We hope that veterans and their families, and any interested patrons in our community, will attend these programs which will explore the American experience of the war and its role in shaping the contemporary world.”

 

The Orion Library is hosting the following events in October and November:

 

Discussion Series

Join Oakland University’s Dr. Karen Miller as she moderates a series of three discussions of readings drawn from the book World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Register for the whole series or any of the evenings online, and stop by the library to pick up the readings being discussed to read ahead of time. Discussions will also include other forms of media related to each evening’s themes.


Wednesday, October 11 @ 7:00p

Why Fight? The Experience of War, Race and WWI


Wednesday, October 18 @ 7:00p

American Women at War, The Home Front: Selling Unity, Suppressing Dissent


Wednesday, October 25 @ 7:00p

America on the World Stage, At Home/Coming Home; The Toll of War
 

Book Discussion

Monday, October 16 @ 7:00p

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

Copies available after September 18 at the Adult Reference desk.

 

World War I “Hello Girl,” Oleda Christides

Wednesday, November 1 @ 7:00p

Join local storyteller Lois Keel as she shares the story of how bilingual operators helped General Pershing in France.

 

PTSD: a Discussion for Veterans and Their Families with Dr. Eric BeShears, clinical psychologist with the John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Tuesday, November 14 @ 7:00p

 

The Makings of America: A WWI Home Front Story

Saturday, November 18 @ 2:00p

Historian Dennis Skupinski will present an interactive program about WWI and Michigan.

 

For more information visit orionlibrary.org/ww1america.

 

This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


Free community event for family caregivers like you

Caregiver Expo: Saturday, October 14, 2017
The Area Agency on Aging 1-B (AAA 1-B) is hosting its 18th Annual Solutions for Family Caregivers Expo to provide caregivers with valuable information, answers, and links to community resources and services.

Saturday, October 14
9 a.m. -  2 p.m.
The Suburban Collection Showplace (See a map and get directions)
46100 Grand River Avenue
Novi, MI 48374

FREE Admission and Parking! 
Pre-registration not required. Registration takes place at door. 
  • Visit with over 100 exhibitors to learn more about products and services available to assist caregivers.
  • Attend expert presentations throughout the day on a variety of topics (see below).
  • “Ask The Resource Specialist” and get answers to questions on Medicare, Medicaid, prescription assistance, transportation options and learn about specific services and resources available in your community.
  • Enjoy free morning refreshments.
  • Cash and carry lunch available.
  • Door prizes & giveaways!
  • Free chair massages
Presentation Schedule:  

9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

  1. How to Protect Your Assets from the Devastating Cost of Long-Term Care
    Christopher J. Berry, VA-Accredited and Certified Elder Law Attorney
    The Elder Care Firm
    Attorney Berry will share the legal steps needed to plan for the long-term care journey for yourself or a loved one, and discuss the six ways to pay for long-term care. Included will be how to plan for governmental assistance with Medicaid and the Veterans Administration (VA) Benefit.
     
  2. Me, Myself and I (Caregiver Health)
    Charlene Whitt, Certified Health Education Specialist
    Caregiving is hard work. When you work hard you should take time for yourself to maintain your own health. However, finding that time can be harder than caregiving. This session is all about you and how to find yourself again.
     
  3. Making the Most of Your Medicare Benefits
    Michael Jakubic, Director of Medicare Sales
    Health Alliance Plan (HAP)
    Are you making the most out of your Medicare benefits? HAP’s Medicare expert will help you learn the various ways to fully utilize your Medicare benefits. Michael will review Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare Advantage and Medigap plans to help you find the best plan for you.
     
  4. Hospice: End of Life Options
    Heather McPherson, Operations Manager
    Personal Touch Home Health Care Services, Inc.
    Today Americans are living longer. With longevity, knowing your end-of-life preferences has become more important. Heather will discuss hospice, palliative care, artificial life support, DNR, advanced directives, VSED, self-determination and their differences to help you be aware of and make informed decisions.

11 a.m. to Noon

  1. Long-Term Care: Resources, Programs and Options That Can Help
    Shavon Walton, Clinical Manager
    Area Agency on Aging 1-B
    Gary Evans, Vice President of Operations
    SameAddress (A program of the AAA 1-B)
    Long-term care options can be confusing. Knowing where to turn for services to help a loved one remain at home is important to them and you. Shavon will explore options available to caregivers like home-delivered meals, personal care, homemaking, support groups and more. Gary will share an innovative senior concierge service that’s available as well as ideas about ways to help caregivers.
     
  2. The Diamond in Your Disappointment
    Beth Weber, RN, HOPE Services
    Caring for the chronically ill involves a variety of unrecognized and misunderstood losses. In this session participants will learn about chronic sorrow or living loss, gain resources to manage recurrent triggers and find the hidden treasure in their troubles so they can persevere and endure with hope.
     
  3. Medicare Advantage or Medigap? What’s the Right Fit?
    Rosemarie Cook, Medicare Sales Consultant
    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
    Too often, Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers let financial considerations drive their plan choice: Which plan has the lowest premium? How complicated is it to use? But Medicare Advantage and Medicare Supplemental plans are different in approach and coverage. This session will educate you on some of the key differences between Medicare Advantage vs. Medicare Supplement plans, so you can make informed decisions.
     
  4. Caring for the Caregiver: Creating Personal Resilience
    Jane Felczak, MSN RN CPPS, Principal Quality Consultant
    Henry Ford Health System
    Resilience is the capacity to bounce back from stress, pressure or disruption. Resilience education teaches you the ability to adjust rapidly to adversity in a healthy manner, and is an integral component of personal well-being. This program was designed to bring meaningful and validated tools to participants, combining the best available data and tools with humor and honesty.

12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

  1. Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors
    Lauren Cetnar, BAA, CTRS, Education Program Coordinator
    Alzheimer’s Association–Greater Michigan Chapter 
    Behavior is one of the primary ways for people with dementia to communicate their needs and feelings when language is lost. However, some behavior can be challenging to caregivers. Join us to learn how to decode behavioral messages, identify common triggers, and learn strategies to help understand and cope with some of the most common behavioral challenges of dementia-related diseases.
     
  2. Finding the Right Medical Care for Your Loved One
    Chris Popp, MD, Regional Medical Director
    Oak Street Health
    Rafe Petty, PhD, Regional Vice President
    Oak Street Health
    Managing a loved one’s medical care can be daunting for family caregivers. Finding the right healthcare provider can make a huge difference. Dr. Popp and Dr. Petty will explore how to work with providers to build a productive relationship and also introduce a different approach to healthcare for adults on Medicare that emphasizes devoting more time to patients in the exam room and beyond.
     
  3. Elder Law Mini-Course for Caregivers
    Jim Schuster, J.D., Certified Elder Law Attorney (CELA)
    Jim Schuster gives you the practical information for managing long-term care. You’ll learn simple, inexpensive steps to take to avoid the devastating costs or making common mistakes, essential legal documents to have, and how to get all of your Medicare, Medicaid and VA benefits without losing your home or life savings. Attendees will take home an information-packed course book.
     
  4. Resources You Might Not Know About: An Information Panel
    Kelly Elswick, Resource Specialist,
    Area Agency on Aging 1-B
    Judy Rathburn, Resource/Mobility Specialist
    MyRide2/Travel and Transportation
    Jenny Jarvis, Chief Strategy Officer 
    Area Agency on Aging 1-B (Moderator, Medicare Part D Open Enrollment)
    Nikki Puroff-Main, Seniors Helping Seniors
Get More Details: 
For complete details, download the 2017Solutions for Family Caregivers ExpoFlyer, visit michigancaregiverexpo.com, or call the Area Agency on Aging 1-B at 800-852-7795.

Help Spread the Word:
If you know any other caregivers who might find the expo helpful, please pass along this info. We've made sharing easy. You can forward this email to a friend or share the event's facebook listing on your own Facebook page.

LTU event to show how Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Immersive Reality affect business

From immersive virtual reality (VR) caves to head-mounted devices (HMDs) to augmented reality (AR) headsets and more, a program at Lawrence Technological University will give attendees a chance to learn about these new tools in a relaxed environment and discover the positive impact they may have on the way business gets done.
 
Join the LTU Collaboratory on Thursday, Sept. 7 for a symposium from 8 a.m. to noon in the UTLC Gallery on the LTU campus, 21000 W. 10 Mile Road, Southfield, for a hands-on demonstrations of the DAQRI Smart Helmet, the Microsoft Hololens, the HTC Vive, the Oculus Rift, and a demonstration of immersive cave technology.
 
Expert presenters will include:
  • Jeff Brum from Mechdyne, on applications of virtual reality from training firefighters to developing a virtual aquarium for a research institute
  • Simon Wealans from DAQRI on how the smart helmet they developed can use augmented reality to save lives on the battlefield, help first responders in cities, and train new workers
  • Steve Couchman from LivePicture on how virtual reality headsets can be used in a design or marketing workflow
Registration is $15 if booked online at www.ltucollaboratory.com/events/ar-vr-ir-oh-my, or $20 at the door. A continental breakfast is included.
 
The event is sponsored by the LTU Collaboratory in partnership with the City of Southfield Centrepolis SmartZone and the Michigan Economic Development Corp.
 
For more information on how the LTU Collaboratory can help your company innovate and grow, visit www.ltucollaboratory.com.
 
Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

Oakland University unveils School of Music, Theatre and Dance

The Oakland University Board of Trustees voted at its August formal meeting to approve the creation of a School of Music, Theatre and Dance. This move follows a consistent expansion and transformation of programs offered by the Department of Music, Theatre and Dance over the past 32 years.
 
“We developed the School of Music, Theatre and Dance to be housed within the College of Arts and Sciences and led by Distinguished Professor of Music Education Jackie Wiggins, who will initiate the roles of Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance on an interim basis until a permanent associate dean can be hired,” said James P. Lentini, D.M.A., senior vice president for Academic Affairs, provost and professor of Music. “In addition, Dr. Wiggins will have an associate director and each of the departments will be headed by a department chair.”
 
“Growing Music, Theatre and Dance from a department into a school should help strengthen our position in the state and regionally, and also enhance our ability to continue recruiting some of the most talented students in all three disciplines,” added Kevin J. Corcoran, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “It should help increase our visibility so that we may serve our region better and open the door to more collaborative learning opportunities and important philanthropic opportunities.”
 
“We are very thankful for the Board’s recognition that the creation of this school was warranted by our blossoming programs and was the next logical step in our development,” said Jackie Wiggins, Ed.D., associate dean and director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
Oakland University was founded in 1957 as a liberal arts college and a part of Michigan State University. The Music Department was established in 1959 and Varner Hall opened in 1970 as the university’s home of performing arts education.
 
Theatre and Dance began as extra-curricular programs at Oakland University. Then, in 1982, the theatre and dance programs joined the existing music department, forming a Department of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
Oakland’s performing arts programs earned accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Music, National Association of Schools of Theatre and National Association of Schools of Dance in 2001.
 
The department has flourished since that time, leading up to this week’s announcement of the formation of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
There are currently 172 faculty and staff members serving 3,400 Oakland University students with about 230 music majors, 110 theatre majors and 60 dance majors. Oakland’s School of Music, Theatre and Dance offers 23 degree programs – bachelor’s through doctoral – six minors and six professional certificate programs. A bachelor’s degree in Music Technology and Industry is also currently under review and the school maintains an active research center, the Center for Applied Research in Musical Understanding.
 
The School of Music, Theatre and Dance provides the campus and surrounding community with more than 200 performances and events each year. Its Music Preparatory Division teaches more than 300 community members each year, ranging from pre-schoolers through senior citizens.
 
Artists-in-residence affiliated with the Oakland University School of Music, Theatre and Dance include world-renowned jazz musician Regina Carter, the Oakland Symphony Orchestra and dance ensembles Eisenhower Dance and Take Root.
 
Professional partners of the school include the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, Meadow Brook Theatre Ensemble, Oakland Youth Orchestras, the Oakland University Cooperative Orchestral Library and Synergy on Stage.
 
The school also supports major study abroad programs, including Traditional Music and Dance Study in Ghana, participation in the Hydrama Theatre Festival in Greece and Dance Study in Germany.
 
Oakland is one of the few universities in the U.S. to have a Brass Band, which has achieved national and international recognition. It also has one of the few undergraduate musical theatre programs to take students to New York to connect with and perform for agents and producers, and to get advice from working actors.
 
In addition, Music, Theatre and Dance alumni have been highly successful in working in performing arts careers, including a voice alumna who recently made her debut at the esteemed La Scala Opera House in Milan, Italy.
 
Learn more about the School of Music, Theatre and Dance by visiting the website.
 
MISSION STATEMENT OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, THEATRE AND DANCE

The School of Music, Theatre and Dance provides pre-professional, professional, liberal arts, and general education in the performing arts through artistically-grounded academic programs and diverse performance opportunities.

Our work is kinetic, alive, visceral––occurring collaboratively among learners and teachers, realizing learner potential, cultivating unique artistic voice––in artistically rigorous, authentic, interactive environments. 
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