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Five Oakland County alternative transportation projects receive part of $9.2 million in funding

Excerpt: 

The Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) is helping fund five county alternative transportation projects. 

The council’s annual Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) is providing $9.2 million in funding for 22 projects across the region during Fiscal Year 2018, which begins Oct. 1.

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Commerce Township to combat invasive species through county partnership program

Excerpt

Officials in Commerce Township have had enough of an invasive weed that is choking area wetlands, sucking water away from native plants and robbing species of their natural habitat. The township will participate in a countywide cooperative invasive species management program to primarily combat phragmites, invasive, feather-topped reeds.

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Drive in, drop off hazardous household waste at NoHaz collections set for Oakland County communities

With nearly 5 million pounds of household hazardous waste properly disposed of since its inception in 2003, the NoHaz Consortium is providing Oakland County residents with an opportunity to do the safe and responsible thing with their household waste.

NoHaz collection events are scheduled from April through October, giving residents convenient opportunities to get rid of everything from outdated computers and dead batteries to paints, pesticides and more. Last year, nearly 4,600 residents loaded up their vehicles, drove to collection events and dropped off more than 633,140 pounds of household hazardous waste

“Oakland County residents have embraced the NoHaz program and responsibly and properly disposed of almost 5 million pounds of hazardous household waste since the program began in 2003,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “I encourage them to take advantage of one of the upcoming collection events and thank them for their participation.”

All 2017 NoHaz collection events run from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays as follows:
  • June 24, Oakland University, 2200 N. Squirrel Road., Rochester
  • July  22, North Sashabaw Elementary School, 5290 Maybee Road., Clarkston
  • Sept.16, Oakland Community College, Highland Lakes Campus, 7350 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford
  • Oct.  28, Wildwood Amphitheater, 2700 Joslyn Court, Orion Township
Residents of the 16 NoHaz Consortium communities may dispose of their HHW for a nominal fee of $10, $15 or at no charge, depending on their community. Any Oakland County resident who does not reside in a NoHaz community may dispose of acceptable materials at any collection event, for a fee of $50.

NoHaz communities are Addison Township, Groveland Township, Independence Township, Lake Angelus, Lake Orion Village, Leonard Village, Oakland Township, Orion Township, Oxford Township, Oxford Village, Pontiac, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Rose Township, Springfield Township and Waterford Township.

Dozens of different household waste products are accepted including: household paints, stains, driveway sealer, asphalt roofing tar, computers, televisions, laptops, DVD/VCR players, cables, accessories, game systems, electronic games, motor oil, gasoline, antifreeze, batteries, pesticides, fungicides, pool chemicals, muriatic acid, aerosols, cleaners, polishes, needles, syringes, inhalers, EpiPens, medication (excluding controlled substances), propane cylinders and tanks, fluorescent lamps and mercury. A complete list of accepted materials can be found at www.nohaz.com.

The NoHaz Consortium is a group of communities that provide residents a safe, reliable and environmentally responsible way to dispose of household hazardous waste. Collection events are coordinated and administered by the Planning Division of the Department of Economic Development & Community Affairs. The Planning Division makes arrangements for the safe and responsible disposal of the materials received.

NoHaz also sponsored a poster contest to educate and engage elementary students about the importance of recycling and proper disposal of household hazardous waste.

The winners are:
  • First place – Nicole Schroeder, fifth grade, Deerfield Elementary School, Avondale Schools,Rochester Hills
  • Second place – Adriana Dimovski, fourth grade, Holy Family Regional School, Rochester Hills
  • Third place – Claire Varzaru, fifth grade, Orion Oaks Elementary, Lake Orion
They will each receive a certificate, a gift card and their artwork is featured on 2017 NoHaz posters.

Oakland County joins PACE program to promote energy efficiency for businesses

Oakland County has joined the Lean & Green Michigan PACE program. As a result, 62 percent of Michigan residents are now covered by PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy), a program that offsets the upfront costs of energy efficiency upgrades through a special property tax assessment.

PACE helps businesses finance energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that save money in the long run but require expensive investment up front. It allows property owners this ability through a special property tax assessment with local governments. The tax assessment then frees up lenders' ability to provide up to 20-year, low rate, fixed-interest loans.

Andy Levin, president of Lean & Green Michigan and managing partner of Levin Energy Partners, believes that the addition of Oakland County creates a critical mass of statewide involvement. The group will now spend more time on speaking to and educating property owners on the benefits of the program.

"The fundamental thing is that PACE is above and beyond politics. It's a straight-up pro-business idea," says Levin. "It has the potential to revolutionize commercial and industrial buildings the same way 30 year fixed mortgages revolutionized the residential market."

While Oakland County is the 20th Michigan county to officially embrace PACE, it already has a number of PACE success stories within its borders. The City of Southfield was the first jurisdiction in the state to become a member of the Lean & Green Michigan PACE program. And two of the four completed PACE projects in Michigan have occurred in Oakland County, including Orion Township-based Powers Distributing.

Powers successfully used PACE to finance a 95kW solar system on the roof of its recycling center as well as the installation of LED lighting throughout the facility. The beer distributor expects to save $48,000 per year in energy costs.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Farmington Hills joins recycling effort

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Farmington Hills residents wondering what to do with unwanted clothing have a new solution: a free, weekly curbside collection program for clothing and small household items provided by Simple Recycling.

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DTE Energy and Vectorform expand Powerley energy saving app in Royal Oak

Excerpt

Powerley, a partnership formed by DTE Energy and Royal Oak-based Vectorform to pioneer the way homeowners manage their energy through a smartphone app, has grown its operation in the last year and is now employing nearly 20 employees. Powerley also moved into new office space in downtown Royal Oak.

The company’s technology platform connects a homeowner's smart meter to Powerley's Energy Bridge and smartphone mobile application to provide real-time, energy consumption information, which allows consumers to more efficiently use energy and see immediate cost savings.

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Rochester Comm. Schools fifth grader "slam dunk" winner in 2016 Oakland County NoHaz poster contest

A Rochester Community Schools fifth grade student was chosen as the winner of the 2016 NoHaz poster contest for his basketball-themed entry that illustrated the safe and responsible way to dispose of household hazardous waste.

Domenic Bruno, a student at North Hill Elementary School, called his entry "Slam Dunk the Junk." It was chosen from among more than 250 entries submitted by elementary schools in Orion Township, Rochester, Rochester Hills and Waterford Township.

"It is impressive to see the depth of knowledge these students have regarding recycling and the proper disposal of household hazardous waste,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “They really do a great job of telling the story. I congratulate them, and their teachers and their parents, for instilling in them the importance of being responsible stewards of our environment.”

The winning artwork was incorporated into the 2016 NoHaz publicity posters, which are on display throughout the 17 member municipalities of the NoHaz Consortium. The consortium initiated the art contest to educate and engage students about the importance of recycling and proper disposal. Bruno received a gift card and award certificate, as did several other finalists. All students who entered received a NoHaz certificate of appreciation.

The NoHaz Consortium provides residents with a safe and responsible means for the disposal of household hazardous waste. Collection events are scheduled throughout the season.

"These collection events demonstrate the commitment and understanding our residents have to being environmental responsible and ensuring our communities remain great places to live, work and play," Patterson said.

The 2016 collection events are from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the following Saturdays:
  • April 30 at Oxford Middle School, 1420 Lakeville Road, Oxford
  • May 21 at North Sashabaw Elementary School, 5290 Maybee Road, Clarkston
  • June 11 at Oakland University, Parking Lots 35, 37, in Rochester
  • Sept. 10 at Oakland Community College Highland Lakes Campus, 7350 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford
  • Oct. 15 at Wildwood Amphitheater, 2700 Joslyn Court, Orion Township
NoHaz member communities are Addison Township, Clarkson, Groveland Township, Independence Township, Lake Angelus, Lake Orion, Leonard, Oakland Township, Orion Township, Oxford Township, Oxford, Pontiac, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Rose Township, Springfield Township and Waterford Township. Visit www.NoHaz.com for more details on NoHaz or the collection events. 

MI Earth Day Fest knocks it out of the park

Large crowds returned to the MI Earth Day Fest in the Rochester Municipal Park, thanks in part to good weather and to improved downtown Rochester parking. Attendees came from all around metro Detroit, and as far away as Flint, Marine City and Grand Rapids. Event organizer MI Green Team L3C estimated weekend attendance at 30,000. Event goers were welcomed with Whole Foods Market tote bags, filled with goodies and sponsor giveaways.

Local officials, including first-year Rochester City Manager Blaine Wing, were on hand for the kickoff/awards ceremony where local kids received recognition for their winning art projects from USGBC Green Schools Committee, and four sustainability leaders were inducted into the MI Green Hall of Fame. These included Jim Leidel of Oakland University, Kathy Vosburg of the Macomb County Board of Commissioners, Deanne Bednar of the Strawbale Studio, and John Carlos of GreeningDetroit.com, whose award was presented by Matt Gibb, Deputy Oakland County Executive. In addition Wendy Barthelemy of Rochester PTA Green Schools was recognized by Carmen Welch, DTE Energy Director of Customer Experience, for her participation in the pilot of a new school fundraising program, the DTE GreenCurrents Enrollment Challenge.

Large audiences enjoyed a full weekend lineup of live music and dance performances on the Emagine Entertainment Stage. Rochester Hills vocal coach Jennifer Kincer presented the program of outstanding local talent and performing groups, including the Pistons PAC and Motor City Irish dancers, the School of Rock, and the Blood & Wine and Kent Koller trios. The stage also hosted several special events including awards for the Earth Day Parade and the 2nd annual RARA Earth Day 5K, and appearances by Scrat and Sid from the Ice Age movies.

“It was great to see people enjoying themselves -- with entertainment, healthy food, door prizes, kids' activities and free massage -- at an event whose purpose is to address so many important and pressing issues. It’s definitely a big part of the event’s focus on solutions and celebration. And, it was a fun way for attendees to relax after serious shopping and sampling at 100 green and healthy products exhibits, checking out expert presentations and wellness programs, and exploring networking opportunities," said the festival’s Outreach Manager, Steve Litz.

The festival’s message – to Make Earth Day Matter -- extended well beyond the festival itself, thanks to generous media partnerships and coverage, which included live TV news feeds on Friday and Saturday, many articles in local newspapers and magazines, and PSAs on local radio stations. Media partners were Fox 2 Detroit, WNIC 100.3 FM, WWJ Newsradio 950, The Oakland Press, The Macomb Daily, Rochester & Rochester Hills Gazette, CMNtv and GreeningDetroit.com.

Event Manager John Batdorf lauded the event’s sponsors, “We landed the dream team of sponsors this year, including SMART Bus, which displayed its newest propane-powered bus, and DTE Energy, which promoted its GreenCurrents voluntary renewable energy program and displayed a plug-in hybrid. The Home Depot of Rochester Hills provided supplies and volunteers, and our newest sponsor, MacKellar Promotional Marketing, provided organic cotton t-shirts, hats, and bamboo award plaques. The event was able to offer free admission, programs and shuttle parking with the generous support of these sponsors."

Photos of the event are available on the festival’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/miearthday under photo album “2016 MI Earth Day Fest.” Dates for next year's 12th annual MI Earth Day Fest have been scheduled for Earth Day weekend, April 21-23, 2017. Details will be available at www.miEDF.com.

MI Green Team L3C (MGT) is Michigan's leading green/wellness network and event producer. Its mission is to promote green living, business and community. MGT is a Michigan “low-profit, limited-liability company,” an innovative business entity that uses business best practices to pursue a socially beneficial purpose. Net profits from MGT events are donated to local green programs. For more information, visit www.migreenteam.com.
 

MI Earth Day Fest returns to Rochester Municipal Park/City Center

The MI Earth Day Fest will return to last year’s new location in the popular Rochester Municipal Park & City Center area, on the banks of the Paint Creek. The 11th annual green/wellness festival will kick off on Earth Day, Friday April 22, and run throughout the weekend. Admission to the event and all programs is free of charge and open to all ages.

“It's never been more important to celebrate Earth Day and there's no better way than participating in the MI Earth Day Fest”, stated the festival’s Outreach Manager, Steve Litz. “The event is one of the largest and liveliest Earth Day celebrations on the planet.”

The festival offers many opportunities for attendees to shop, learn and celebrate green and healthy living. More than 100 exhibitors will offer eco-friendly products and services, free samples, show specials, door prizes and giveaways. Leading environmental and wellness community groups will provide expert presentations, hands-on workshops and networking round-tables in the Connect Café tent. Free massage, yoga and other wellness programs will also be available.

Food trucks and vendors will offer a variety of healthy and delicious organic/natural meals, snacks and drinks. The Whole Kids Korner will host activities, arts and crafts, as well as strawbale and tower climbs. Jennifer Kincer, Festival Entertainment Manager and popular emcee, will present a full weekend line-up of family-friendly music and dance on the main stage, including award-winning local groups, talented newcomers and daily headliners.

Several special events are planned throughout the weekend including a Friday 7pm awards ceremony recognizing winners of the 2016 MI Green Hall of Fame, USGBC My Green School Art Contest and DTE GreenCurrents Earth Day Challenge, as well as a Saturday 11am parade and a Sunday 8am RARA 5k Fun Run. 

Event Manager, John Batdorf, commented on the event’s venue, “A major Earth Day event belongs at this beautiful setting in a city like Rochester, which integrates an award-winning downtown and many natural attractions.” Batdorf continued, “With the festival established at this great location and downtown construction completed, resulting in hundreds of new parking spaces, we’re planning for the return of large crowds seen in previous years.” 

Free admission and programming are sponsored by DTE Energy GreenCurrents, Emagine Entertainment, MacKellar Promotional Marketing, Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART), The Home Depot, and Whole Foods Market.

Festival details and directions, as well as participant information, is available online at www.miEDF.com.

MI Green Team L3C (MGT) is Michigan's leading green/wellness network and event producer. Its mission is to promote green living, business and community. MGT is a Michigan “low-profit, limited-liability company,” an innovative business entity that uses business best practices to pursue a socially beneficial purpose. Net profits from MGT events are donated to local green programs. For more information, visit www.migreenteam.com.

Drive in, drop off hazardous household waste at NoHaz collections set for five OC communities

Residents of 17 North Oakland Household Hazardous Waste (NoHaz) communities will have five opportunities to responsibly rid their households of hazardous waste from April through October.

The first collection is set for April 30 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Oxford Middle School, 1420 Lakeville Road in Oxford. The event gives residents easy-access opportunities to get rid of everything from outdated computers and dead batteries to paints, pesticides and more. Last year, nearly 4,000 residents loaded up their vehicles, drove to collection events and dropped off more than half a million pounds of hazardous household waste.

“Oakland County residents have embraced the NoHaz program and responsibly and properly disposed of more than 4.2 million pounds of hazardous household waste since the program began in 2003,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “I thank the residents for their participation and encourage them to take advantage of one of the upcoming collection events.”

The 2016 NoHaz collection events are held on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The other times and locations are:
  • May 21, North Sashabaw Elementary School, 5290 Maybee Road, Clarkston
  • June 11, Oakland University, parking lots 35 & 37, Rochester
  • Sept. 10, Oakland Community College, Highland Lakes Campus, 7350 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford
  • Oct. 15, Wildwood Amphitheater, 2700 Joslyn Court, Orion Township
Residents of the 17 NoHaz Consortium communities may dispose of their hazardous household waste for a nominal fee of $10; or at no charge, depending on their community. Residents of non-member communities pay $50. Check www.nohaz.com for a detailed list of fees by community.

NoHaz communities are Addison Township, Clarkston, Groveland Township, Independence Township, Lake Angelus, Lake Orion, Leonard, Oakland Township, Orion Township, Oxford Township, Oxford, Pontiac, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Rose Township, Springfield Township and Waterford Township.

Dozens of different household waste products are accepted including: household paints, stains, driveway sealer, asphalt roofing tar, computers, televisions, laptops, DVD/VCR players, cables, accessories, game systems, electronic games, motor oil, gasoline, antifreeze, batteries, pesticides, fungicides, pool chemicals, muriatic acid, aerosols, batteries, cleaners, polishes, needles, syringes, inhalers, EpiPens, medication (excluding controlled substances), propane cylinders, fluorescent lamps and mercury. A complete list of accepted materials can be found at www.nohaz.com.

The NoHaz Consortium is a group of communities that provide residents a safe, reliable and environmentally responsible way to dispose of household hazardous waste. Collection events are coordinated and administered by the Planning Division of the Department of Economic Development & Community Affairs. The Planning Division makes arrangements for the safe and responsible disposal of the materials received.
 

Returning Future City champions, Michigan, to compete in regional finals

Over the years, cities and towns have managed their ever-expanding piles of trash in a variety of ways, including dumping it into landfills, burning it in incinerators, or shipping it away in trucks and barges. Such waste management systems contribute to air and water pollution and can be expensive and energy intensive. Today, engineers around the world focus on the four R’s of waste management (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Rot) in an effort to deal with solid waste not as trash but as a resource.
 
With waste management critical to the very survival of global urban environments, the 2015-2016 Future City® Competition, a program of DiscoverE, has tasked middle schoolers to design new and innovative solutions to this vexing problem.

Since returning to school earlier this fall, student teams from Michigan have been hard at work on their Future City projects. As they prepare for their regional finals this January, set for January 25, 2016 at Suburban Collection Showplace they join more than 40,000 middle school students from 1,350 schools in 37 regions around the country, all of whom are engaged in similar competitions. 

First-place winners from each qualifying regional competition receive a trip to the Future City Competition National Finals in Washington, D.C., February 13-17, 2016, immediately prior to Engineers Week. 

This year’s theme, Waste Not, Want Not, encourages students to design waste management systems for residential use and small businesses by looking at issues such as collection, separation, processing, recycling, health and safety, energy efficiency, environmental impact and cost. Students learn how today’s engineers and city planners deal with citywide sustainability issues like solid waste management. They research cutting edge technologies and imagine and design a plausible and futuristic solution that can exist for generations.

The Future City Competition is a national, project-based learning experience where students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade imagine, research, design, and build cities of the future. Keeping the engineering design process and project management front and center, students are asked to address an authentic, real-world question: How can we make the world a better place?
 
One of the nation’s leading engineering education programs and among the most popular, Future City has received national attention and acclaim for its role in encouraging middle schoolers nationwide to develop their interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). 

In 2015, Future City was named the grand prize winner in the UL (Underwriters Laboratories Inc.) Innovative Education Award program, receiving a $100,000 award. The UL award highlights the essential, urgent and significant value of E-STEM education.

Barbara Guthrie, UL’s Vice President of Safety, said "We are tremendously pleased at how Future City has incorporated the strongest principles of the E-STEM approach to give young people the unprecedented opportunities to build their skills in science and systems thinking. They have demonstrated not only a passion for research and scientific investigation but also how this work ties in critically to addressing significant environmental concerns with approaches that encourage social responsibility and the active engagement of all members in a specific community.”

Working in a team with an educator and engineer mentor, students are challenged to design a virtual city using SimCity™ software. They research today’s waste management systems and write a city description about their solutions and city design. Students then bring their ideas to life by building a tabletop scale model of their city using recycled materials on a budget of $100 or less and give a brief presentation about their city.    
 
Major funding for the National Finals comes from Bechtel Corporation, Bentley Systems, and Shell Oil Company.
 
To learn more, visit www.futurecity.org or our Facebook page.
 

Clinton River Watershed Council hosting annual stonefly search event

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The Clinton River Watershed Council is looking for volunteers for its Annual Winter Stonefly Search, which will help determine the health of local rivers and streams.

Volunteers for the annual search will meet at 9 a.m. Jan. 23 at the watershed council’s main office at 1115 W. Avon Road in Rochester Hills.

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Why the Detroit Zoo was Crain's Best-Managed Nonprofit of 2015

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Most nonprofits face trends or threats that require a response on their part.

But not many face global threats.

Several years ago during strategic planning, the Detroit Zoo realized that while sustainability was implied in its conservation and animal welfare mission, it hadn't been intentional about being green. And environmental concerns were rising.

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Community partnership helps get 'clean diesels' on the roads of Michigan

As part of a collaboration to help address air pollution from diesel engines, the State of Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), a member of Michigan Clean Diesel Initiative (MiCDI), recently awarded “Clean Diesel” grant financial assistance to Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision (SDEV). This grant will partially fund improvements to three private vehicle fleets, including partial funding to help replace two older refrigerated box trucks in Forgotten Harvest’s fleet.
 
For Forgotten Harvest’s improvements, MDEQ’s financial support required at least a 75 percent funding match, leading to a broader collaboration to meet the program’s clean air goals. Southfield-based Real Estate One donated the majority of the matching funds to replace one of Forgotten Harvest’s refrigerated box trucks. Troy, Michigan-based Meritor, Inc., a leading global supplier of drivetrain, mobility, braking and aftermarket solutions for commercial vehicle and industrial markets, also contributed matching funds to acquire this new truck. 
 
The truck dedication will take place at Real Estate One, 25800 Northwestern Highway, Southfield, Michigan, on Friday, September 11 at 3:00 p.m.
 
MDEQ administers MiCDI funds, which are authorized by the federal Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) and released by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). MDEQ awarded funds to SDEV’s Clean Diesel Program for the purpose of improving air quality by reducing diesel emissions. The diesel equipment on the new replacement trucks will meet or exceed the current highest EPA emissions standards, reducing harmful diesel air pollutants. The new replacement trucks for Forgotten Harvest’s fleet will replace trucks operating primarily in Detroit and in Western Wayne County.
 
“We are honored for the ‘Clean Diesel’ collaboration with MDEQ and SDEV, which reinforces the environmental benefits of Forgotten Harvest’s mission: rescuing surplus healthy food for distribution to people in need and, thereby, reducing food waste and its associated environmental harm,” said Kirk Mayes, CEO, Forgotten Harvest. “We are humbled and grateful for our involvement with MDEQ, SDEV, Real Estate One and Meritor – for our first new replacement truck under this Clean Diesel Program.”  
 
Real Estate One is a long-time generous supporter of Forgotten Harvest’s work. “Helping feed people in need while also improving Michigan’s air quality is a double honor for us,” said Stuart Elsea, president, Financial Services. “We regularly have teams volunteer at Forgotten Harvest’s warehouse, and we raise funds along with awareness in support of giving back as part of our corporate social responsibility.  Contributing a major share of the matching funds to purchase this new, replacement truck with ‘clean diesel’ equipment enhances our commitment to the thousands of people Forgotten Harvest serves while providing environmental benefits to our community.”
 
“We are proud that a Meritor rear axle is the backbone of this new clean diesel truck that will make a difference in so many people’s lives,” said Krista Sohm, vice president, Marketing & Communications for Meritor.
 
SDEV is one of Detroit’s longest running environmental non-profit organizations, serving the community for over 25 years. “Our Clean Diesel Program began in 2009 and is focused on reducing negative public health and environmental impacts from the significant diesel vehicle traffic in and around Southwest Detroit,” said Kathy Stott, executive director, SDEV. “Our truly collaborative program eliminates over 4,500 tons of diesel pollutants annually. We are proud that this project with Forgotten Harvest, and by extension their supporters, has allowed us to benefit another nonprofit organization, ensuring that their important operation to eliminate food waste and feed people in need can do so while also reducing air pollution from their fleet.”
 
About Forgotten Harvest 
Oak Park, Michigan-based Forgotten Harvest was formed in 1990 to fight two problems: hunger and waste.  Forgotten Harvest “rescued” nearly 41 million pounds of food last year by collecting surplus prepared and perishable food from over 800 locations, including grocery stores, fruit and vegetable markets, restaurants, caterers, dairies, farmers, wholesale food distributors and other Health Department-approved sources. This donated food, which would otherwise go to waste, is delivered free-of-charge to 280 emergency food providers in the metro Detroit area.  Forgotten Harvest has been ranked as a four-star charity by Charity Navigator for nine consecutive years.  Learn more about Forgotten Harvest and how to help drive hunger from our community at www.forgottenharvest.org.

Detroit Zoo wants your help turning animal poop into energy

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The Detroit Zoo in Royal Oak is exploring ways to turn animal poop into energy.

The Detroit Zoological Society and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation have launched a crowdfunding campaign to help them build an energy-producing biodigester. 

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